Avoid a Creative Block with These Writing Tips

Cape Times (South Africa), August 11, 2009 | Go to article overview
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Avoid a Creative Block with These Writing Tips


BYLINE: sarah-jane bosch

The way written communications are presented in a business environment shows a lot about the writer.

A well thought out and prepared report that reads easily and shows attention to detail can do wonders for your boss's or client's impression of you. But how do you ensure that your written communications are effective when the moment you think about the report that is due for tomorrow you clam up and suffer from writer's block?

The Getsmarter team offers some tips for effective business reports, letters and proposals, with acknowledgement to Terri Grant and Rea Borcherd's Communicating at Work.

Identifying the purpose behind your communication will determine the type of communication you choose as well as its content, format and style. In business writing, the most common purposes are information, persuasion, motivation, expression of feelings and building relationships.

Once you have identified the purpose of your communication, you can determine whether to use formal or informal language and if the content should be based on facts, opinions or feelings.

Your communication must also be suited to its intended recipients. The answers to the following questions will give you a better understanding of what information is relevant to your purpose and what should be included in your written communication to "hit home" with its intended recipients:

lWho is my audience?

lHow informed are they on the subject of my communication?

lWhat should they know or understand by the time they have read my communication?

lWhat is their attitude towards the subject of my communication?

lWhat information or facts are necessary to persuade or motivate them?

Writer's block often occurs when people begin by writing without first thinking and gathering information.

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Avoid a Creative Block with These Writing Tips
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