Action-Guidance: An Action Research Project for the Application of Informing Science in Educational and Vocational Guidance

By Cartelli, Antonio | Issues in Informing Science & Information Technology, Annual 2004 | Go to article overview

Action-Guidance: An Action Research Project for the Application of Informing Science in Educational and Vocational Guidance


Cartelli, Antonio, Issues in Informing Science & Information Technology


Introduction

Many recent research studies, especially the OECD and the UNESCO analyses of secondary education's status and evolution, show that many students do not graduate from high school. In Italy, as the most recent yearly reports of the Italian Ministry of Education show, the phenomenon is much more pronounced, in spite of the large number of innovations in curricula and school organization that public institutions carried out during the last years. Furthermore, the percentage of the students leaving the Italian schools before graduation is among the highest in the European countries and, as comparison with the other Western countries shows, among the highest ones among the developed countries.

The size of the problem of students' departure recently induced the Italian Ministry of Education to start some projects to uncover the reasons students drop out of school and to suggest interventions to give better guidance to the same students in their professional and educational choices.

The 2nd level Master course for "Educational Guidance Agents", organized from a consortium of Italian Universities and devoted to the High School teachers of the Lazio Region in Central Italy, is one among the various initiatives funded by the Italian National and Regional Authorities to hit the above target.

As this paper shows, the involvement of the author as a professor within that Master course and the discussions he held with the teachers taking part at the lectures on the main features of this guidance process gradually led to the hypothesis involving the application of Action Research strategies and of Informing Science ideas and, especially, to the adoption of an Information System for the monitoring of the educational and vocational guidance action and for the building of a community of study and research who could help students in better living within the School and in making conscious choices about their school and professional careers.

Educational and Vocational Guidance

Educational and Vocational Guidance are often seen as two different aspects of the more general guidance process that makes people able to autonomously choose their course of study or their future work life. The complexity of the guidance process naturally involves the competences and contributions pertaining to various disciplines, such as psychology, sociology, anthropology and pedagogy, and contributes to looking at the guidance action as an interdisciplinary field of investigation. The suggestions emerging from the above disciplines agree on the main trait and aim (at least in the school) of that process: that is to enable students to steer themselves by means of a project of life that they build together with their teachers and families (Mancinelli, 1999). Among the various disciplines interested in the guidance process, the ones this author will analyze in a greater detail will be psychology and pedagogy, because of the high number of experiences concerning them that are reported in scientific literature and for the importance they will have in what follows. It is well known in fact that psychology mainly looks at the individual evolution and at the interventions to be made on the subjects for a successful guidance process; on the other hand, pedagogy and, especially, didactics look at the whole educational process and at its management for a global intervention on the students' guidance and for making them develop self-assessment and decision skills together with good evaluation instruments.

Educational Guidance and Psychology

From a psychological point of view it is well known that the guidance process aims to lead the students to develop design and planning skills and that two different ways of intervention can be used to hit this target (Gibson & Mitchell, 1999):

--the self-guidance action, i.e. the skills and the behaviors that the subjects have to carry out for facing the problems they meet in school, at work or in their everyday life, and that are induced from the psycho-sociological processes,

--the professional interventions that various kinds of agents and professionals can carry out to help people in the development of their guidance skills.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Action-Guidance: An Action Research Project for the Application of Informing Science in Educational and Vocational Guidance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.