Innovative Programs Affect Recruitment of Teachers: Aligning Teaching Talents and Innovative Curricula

By Faltz, Darlene T. | Diversity Employers, February 1998 | Go to article overview

Innovative Programs Affect Recruitment of Teachers: Aligning Teaching Talents and Innovative Curricula


Faltz, Darlene T., Diversity Employers


Instructional changes in education affect teacher recruitment. As more schools and their community members set goals based on their priorities, needs and resources, recruiters for these schools will hire new teachers whose knowledge and skills demonstrate their ability to work within the innovative programs these schools have developed. Recruiters will seek skilled teachers who envision the change process as well as the goal or mission of the school.

As these schools implement their plans to educate students, they work as a community, the members of which are each responsible for the results. This community process is evident with school-based management where administrators at the school rather than those at the central office departments make decisions that most directly affect students, their teachers and the instructional process. Teachers, students, parents and administrators participate in the decision-making process as schools set goals and develop instructional programs that result in student achievement. Collaboration among new and existing teachers builds supportive bonds and encourages collegiality.

Since the 1990-91 school year, Prince William County Public Schools, located in Northern Virginia, has operated under a school-based management philosophy. Several schools have special programs that focus on single and dual foreign language immersion, integrated thematic instruction, non-graded primary instruction, early intervention and "looping" wherein teachers stay with groups of students for more than one year.

Students interested in becoming teachers at schools with innovative programs are encouraged to become familiar with specific programs that require them to have innovative instructional strategies and take ownership of the position that they are seeking. They should look for positions that complement their approach to and style of teaching. Such positions will result in there being more successful teachers who retain their enthusiasm and desire to do something of value to help students learn.

New teachers uncommitted to and uninvolved in the innovative curricula their schools use may feel inadequate and soon become discouraged from passive, uninspired classroom experiences or they may be intimidated by other pressures. The important point is that new teachers need to align their own creative talents, skills and interests with innovative programs developed by individual schools.

Prepared answers

Students should be prepared to discuss the following: (a) a variety of teaching strategies and skills they have acquired through their student teaching experiences, (b) innovative projects they have developed for their students, (c) a lesson plan that went extremely well, (d) how they helped students achieve success, (e) their teaching style and how they would accommodate the different learning styles of students in their classes, (f) current trends in public education, and (g) contributions that they think they can make to a given school, and their perceptions of what teaching consists of. …

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Innovative Programs Affect Recruitment of Teachers: Aligning Teaching Talents and Innovative Curricula
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