The Role of a Lifetime - Stephen Fry: The Man Behind Oscar Wilde

By Stockwell, Anne | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), April 28, 1998 | Go to article overview

The Role of a Lifetime - Stephen Fry: The Man Behind Oscar Wilde


Stockwell, Anne, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


Like Oscar Wilde himself, Stephen Fry is larger than life. Although he's less famous in America than life. Cambridge University classmate Emma Thompson, the 40-year-old Fry has spent more than a decade as one of British television's favorite comic actors. He regularly pops up in London's West End theater scene, in films (A Fish Called Wanda, I.Q., Peter's Friends), and on spoken-word audiotapes that showcase his scrumptious baritone voice.

Still, Fry has been busier as a writer than as a performer, penning countless articles and scripts, a memoir, and four novels. (His latest, Making history, is just out from Random House.)

It's no accident that Britons associate him with his famous predecessor. Like Wilde, Fry is gay. Like Wilde, he's physically imposing, although, at 6 feet 4 1/2 inches, Fry is a shade taller. Like Wilde, Fry has even served jail time. "I was sent to prison at the age of 17 for committing credit card fraud," Fry genially volunteers. "Afterward I pulled myself together, got a scholarship to Cambridge, and became slightly more normal."

In good times and bad, Fry has labored under one expectation. As he puts it, "It's been said for some time that I was, in that tiresome phrase, `born to be Wilde.'" Now, In an exclusive interview, he tells The Advocate how it felt to carry out his mission for queen and country.

You're one of Britain's best-known gay actors. Were you ever in the closet?

No. Luckily I was out to my parents when I was 17. With most actors, if they aren't out, it's nearly always because they're not out to their parents -- even through, of course, their parents almost certify know. It gets harder and harder for some people as time goes by.

From what we understand, you've always had a personal interest in Oscar Wide. Why?

Especially growing up as a gay teenager, one was in desperate need of a gay role model. Although Oscar's life turned out to be tragic, he was someone with whom I could fiercely and proudly identify. I read bits of Wilde from the age of 13 on.

Where were you when you were first reading Wilde?

I was at a very ancient boarding school called Uppingham. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Role of a Lifetime - Stephen Fry: The Man Behind Oscar Wilde
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.