FOF's James Dobson: A Rogue Elephant in the GOP 'Big Tent.' (Founder of Focus on the Family to Wage a Crusade to Correct the Republican Party's mistakes)(Editorial)

Church & State, March 1998 | Go to article overview

FOF's James Dobson: A Rogue Elephant in the GOP 'Big Tent.' (Founder of Focus on the Family to Wage a Crusade to Correct the Republican Party's mistakes)(Editorial)


James Dobson is spoiling for a fight. Speaking to a conclave of conservative leaders in Phoenix Feb. 7, the religious broadcaster launched into a tirade against the Republican Party's "betrayal" of conservative Christian voters.

The GOP, Dobson told the Council for National Policy, has accepted the contributions and grassroots activism of "the pro-moral community," but has not delivered on its agenda.

"Does the Republican Party want our votes - no strings attached - to court us every two years, and then to say, 'Don't call me. I'll call you.' And to not care about the moral law of the universe," growled the Focus on the Family (FOF) founder. "Is that what they want'? Is that the way the system works'? ls this the way it's going to be'? If it is, I'm gone, and ill go, I will do everything I can to take as many people with me as possible."

Dobson's list of issues he wants addressed contained the usual Religious Right litany: religious school voucher subsidies, abortion restrictions, attacks on gay people, public school bashing, defunding of the National Endowment for the Arts and opposition to the appointment of Supreme Court justices and other public officials who don't toe the FOF line.

Dobson was particularly incensed that the Republican National Committee recently shot down a resolution banning party funding for candidates who support so-called "partial birth" abortion, a late-term procedure the Religious Right is seeking to outlaw. He bitterly denounced the procedure along with the GOP's "big tent" philosophy that tolerates people with pro-choice views on abortion or other contentious social issues.

"We're not talking about partial birth abortion here." Dobson raged. "We're talking about murder during delivery. We're talking about infanticide. I want to tell you all something from my heart: there is no tent big enough for me and people who will do that."

In the upcoming months Dobson has vowed to wage an all-out crusade to correct the errant GOP leadership. He is sure to have help from his Washington political operative Gary Bauer, head of the Family Research Council.

Bauer, who is reportedly considering his own presidential bid, grumbled to The Washington Times that no Republican leader has responded to Dobson's complaints.

The Dobson gambit richly illustrates the central problem that many Americans have with the Religious Right and its activities. The Colorado Springs theocrat and his allies just don't seem to understand the realities of living in a pluralistic democracy.

In America political parties are not churches, and public policy is not synonymous with religious doctrine. In a nation that separates religion and government, narrow sectarian theology cannot be the basis for law, and religious authorities cannot expect to issue edicts to political and governmental leaders.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

FOF's James Dobson: A Rogue Elephant in the GOP 'Big Tent.' (Founder of Focus on the Family to Wage a Crusade to Correct the Republican Party's mistakes)(Editorial)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.