Terrorist Targeting of Police: The Global Terror Network Launched by the Soviet KGB in the 1960s, Now Dressed in Jihadist Garb, Continues a Decades-Long War against Law Enforcement in the Non-Communist World

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, August 17, 2009 | Go to article overview

Terrorist Targeting of Police: The Global Terror Network Launched by the Soviet KGB in the 1960s, Now Dressed in Jihadist Garb, Continues a Decades-Long War against Law Enforcement in the Non-Communist World


Jasper, William F., The New American


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The armed struggle of the urban guerrilla points toward two essential objectives: ... the physical liquidation of the chiefs and assistants of the armed forces and of the police.... It is necessary for every urban guerrilla to keep in mind always that he can only maintain his existence it he is disposed to kill the police and those dedicated to repression.

--Mini-Manual of the Urban Guerrilla Carlos Marighella, 1969

ITEM: "Al Qaeda suicide attack hits police center in Algeria," August 19, 2008

ITEM: "Pakistan ambush kills four police officials," July 19, 2009

ITEM: "Ten killed, including seven police, in Iraq violence," July 20, 2009

ITEM: "Terrorists in Iraq target police: 350 killed in year," Match 26, 2004

ITEM: "Child, senior police officer killed in Mosul attacks," July 6, 2009

ITEM: "Blast hits Islamabad police station, 2 killed, 3 wounded," June 7, 2009 To the headlines listed above could be added hundreds more cataloging the concerted global attack by terrorist organizations against law enforcement. Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster (Los Angeles Police Department, retired), writing for Hi-Tech Criminal Justice, notes that "as of August 14, 2005, world-wide, there have been 554 terrorist attacks targeting police officers. These attacks resulted in 2,546 injuries and 1,327 fatalities."

From Malaysia to Turkey, and Colombia to Pakistan, the trend seems to be spiking upward. According to the press reports, many, if not most, of the attacks on police mentioned above are the work of "Islamic extremists." However, the current round of terrorist attacks on law enforcement bears ah unmistakable resemblance to previous orchestrated campaigns of "escalating violence" by Soviet-directed Marxist-Leninist terror groups. The more astute counterterrorism analysts have noted virtually all of the significant "Islamic" terrorist groups carrying out these attacks--al-Qaeda, Hezbollah, Hamas, Palestinian Islamic Jihad, Taliban, Lashkar e-Taiba, Abu Sayyef, etc.--were formed by, and/or are led by, chiefs who are "former" communists. These same "militant Islamicists" maintain open cordial relations with the Kremlin "infidels" and more secret back-channel relations with the Russian KGB-FSB and GRU, through whom they receive not only arms, munitions, and explosives, bur also training and intelligence.

Communists as Jihadists

As Finnish counterterrorism expert Antero Leitzinger has noted in his enlightening study The Roots of Islamic Terrorista, "Afghan communists have a broad history of 'turning coats,' or to be more accurate, of growing beards and adopting the title 'Mullah' attached to a pseudonym." The most important Taliban leaders--Abdurrashid Dostum, Shahnawaz Tanai, Gulbuddin Hikmatyar--are longtime, career communists and KGB operatives. Their attacks on the Afghani and Pakistani police have been taken from the communist game plan, as put forth in the Mini-Manual of the Urban Guerrilla (quoted above), authored by Brazilian Communist Party member Carlos Marighella.

Since its publication 40 years ago, this text has been translated into many languages and published in many editions. It has become a standard handbook of terrorists (including so-called Islamic terrorists) worldwide, from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. The Mini-Manual focuses a considerable portion of its attention on instructing would-be terrorist cadres on the importance of targeting the police and how to go about attacking them in the most efficient manner.

Marighella tells his Mini-Manual readers, for instance, that among the "vulnerable targets fro assaults" are commissaries and police stations, jails, and military and police vehicles. His students of mayhem are taught the importance of ambushing police:

      Ambushes are attacks typified by
   surprise when the enemy is trapped
   across a road or when he makes a
   police net surrounding a house or an
   estate. … 

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