The 2008 Frances Rutherford Lecture Taking a Stand for Inclusion: Seeing beyond Impairment!

By Carlsson, Carolyn Simmons | New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2009 | Go to article overview

The 2008 Frances Rutherford Lecture Taking a Stand for Inclusion: Seeing beyond Impairment!


Carlsson, Carolyn Simmons, New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy


Mihi

Nga mihi hoki ki te Atua, i manaaki i te hokianga o tenei whenua tapu, nana nei nga mea katoa i hanga, tena koe, tena koe, tena koe, e te Atua.

Nga Maunga, nga Awa, e nga Mana, e nga Reo, e nga Iwi, e nga Hapu, e nga Tipuna Matua o tenei whenua tapu, me kii te Iwi nei a Rangitane o Palmerston North (Papaoia), tena koutou, tena koutou, tena koutou katoa.

Me hoki ano a tatou whakaaro ki a ratou, kua wehe atu ra ki te wahi o Hinenuitepo, haere koutou, haere, haere, ki Hawaiiki Nui, te hono ki wairua moemoe ra. Apiti hono tatai hono, te hunga mate ki te hunga mate. Te hunga ora ki te hunga ora, tena koutou, tena koutou, haere atu ra.

Kia ora ano. Me mihi ki nga tini Kaihaumanu Turoro, i takoto nga tikanga whakahekea mai, i tetahi whakatipuranga ki tetahi, tae noa mai, ki to tatou e hui, tena koutou.

Nga mihi hoki ki a Yvonne Thomas, korua ko Karen Rebeiro Gruhl, i tae pamamao hei kaikorero matua mai, ki to tatou Hui Nui.

Kua tae mai tatou ki tenei whenua tapu ki te korero tahi, ki te kawe mai i nga whakaaro, nga tumanakohanga mo tenei kaupapa (Kaihaumanu Turoro) New Zealand Association o Occupational Therapists o Aotearoa, whanui he mihi mahana ki a koutou katoa ra hoki.

He tino honore tenei maku, ki te korero atu ki a koutou, i te rangi nei.

Greetings to the gods who care for people (Hokianga/host tribe) of this sacred land, the god who created everything, greetings, and thank you. The mountains, the rivers, the mana, the voices of the iwi/people, the sub tribe, the ancestors of this sacred land, and to the iwi/tribe here, Rangitane guardians of this area Palmerston North, thank you, greetings to you all. We should return our thoughts and acknowledge those who have passed on before us, who have crossed over into Hinenuitepo, farewell, go to Hawaiiki; who are linked to the spirit world, rest in peace, farewell to you in the spirit world farewell! To us all here in the world of the living, greetings to you all. Greetings to the generations of occupational therapists (Kaihaumanu Turoro) that have come before us, guided us to where we are now. Greetings to Yvonne Thomas and Karen Rebeiro Gruhl, keynote speakers who have come from afar to be with us. Warm greetings to the New Zealand Association of Occupational Therapists. This is indeed an honour to stand before you and give this presentation today.

To arrive at the point of the title of this paper, it is important that I begin by acknowledging what has come before. I will then discuss the notion of a stand for inclusion through the lens of occupational justice, sprinkled with questions for take-home reflection. School-based practice is offered as an exemplar, alongside findings from the author's research in the schooling sector (Simmons Carlsson, 2006; Simmons Carlsson, Hocking, & Wright-St Clair, 2007). Whilst not all occupational therapists work with children and young people whose occupations fall within the roles of student, learner, peer, friend, and player, the hope is that as you read this korero (discourse), you will be able to draw parallels from your own self, where the challenges of inclusion, inclusive practice, and occupational injustices may be similar. Readers are also invited to use this time to reflect on ways in which occupational therapy practice has evolved over time to go forward in one's occupational thinking. First, let me stand and look to past.

The Frances Rutherford Lecture Award

The Frances Rutherford Lecture Award (FRLA) honours the contribution made by Miss Frances Rutherford to the profession of occupational therapy in Aotearoa/New Zealand (Wright-St Claire, Gordon & Wilson, 2007). Born and educated in Wairarapa, Rutherford, described by Boyd, (1984) as a caring and warm person with vision, energy, and commitment, was by all accounts an amazing woman. Her educational achievements included diplomas in the field of fine arts, teaching, and occupational therapy. …

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