Editorial

New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 2007 | Go to article overview

Editorial


In browsing through some old editions of the journal recently, I was interested to note that it is nearly 23 years since the first Frances Rutherford Lecture was presented by Mary-Anne Boyd. Primarily the award was created to encourage occupational therapists in their professional career. It was named after Frances Rutherford, as a tribute to the significant contribution she made towards advancing the profession of occupational therapy in New Zealand. Accordingly the recipient of the award is an occupational therapist, nominated by peers, for efforts to promote and advance the profession.

In her lecture: Quality assurance in occupational therapy (JNZAOT, 1984/5) Ms Boyd called on occupational therapists to embrace diversity in practice. I was struck by the similarities between Ms. Boyd's inaugural address and this current edition of the journal. Ms. Boyd stated that quality assurance means "striving for excellence" which is exactly what the authors are promoting.

Merrolee Penman is the most recent recipient of the Frances Rutherford Award and as promised we bring you the lecture delivered by Merrolee at the NZAOT Conference last year. Merrolee shares her insights on the need for diversity when it comes to knowledge development. Ways of learning are discussed and alternative methods proposed. Endorsing the theme of diversity is another late entry from the conference. Michael Iwama encourages us to advance the concept of cultural diversity in practice. He believes that broad dimensions of culture are absolutely fundamental to the future of occupational therapy here in New Zealand and beyond.

Jackie Herkt and Clare Hocking highlight the significance of supervision. They envisage a creative process designed to ensure clinicians are competent to practice. An important feature of this article is professional development and its relationship to the quality of service provision.

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