Bury the Messenger; the White House Muzzles a Global Warming Skeptic

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 25, 2009 | Go to article overview

Bury the Messenger; the White House Muzzles a Global Warming Skeptic


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

If you can't muzzle the whistleblower, try to marginalize him. That seems to be the strategy of the Obama administration, which is showing that its commitment to liberal ideology trumps its pledge to foster open government.

In June, the Competitive Enterprise Institute made waves by releasing internal e-mails from the Environmental Protection Agency. In those messages, a top administrator told a key researcher that the researcher's new report would not be released. Why? Because it does not help the legal or policy case for a controversial decision to treat global warming as a health hazard. In short, because researcher Alan Carlin's conclusions differed from the administration's political agenda, his research was ignored.

Mr. Carlin, who holds a doctorate in economics with an undergraduate degree in physics, examined numerous studies on global warming. His scorching message to his political bosses at EPA: I have become increasingly concerned that EPA has itself paid too little attention to the science of global warming. EPA and others have tended to accept the findings reached by outside groups.. as being correct without a careful and critical examination That examination shows, Mr. Carlin said, that available observable data.. invalidate the hypothesis that humans cause serious global warming

With the administration so heavily invested in a regulatory scheme to combat supposed warming, this message was far from welcome. …

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