A Tale of Two Depressions: Come the Next Catastrophe, We Will Rue Governments' Cowardice in Failing to Reform the Banks

By Jacques, Martin | New Statesman (1996), August 3, 2009 | Go to article overview
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A Tale of Two Depressions: Come the Next Catastrophe, We Will Rue Governments' Cowardice in Failing to Reform the Banks


Jacques, Martin, New Statesman (1996)


Talk of economic recovery is in the air. The FTSE has been steadily climbing over recent days. The banks are once more recruiting and paying fat bonuses. The sense of impending financial catastrophe which stalked the western world last autumn now seems a long time ago. But the mood of cautious optimism that is tangible in some circles is profoundly misplaced.

Certainly, as a result of the decisive action of governments last autumn, a meltdown has been averted and the financial sector has made a modest recovery. The US banks are once more recording significant profits, with a similar improvement in the UK. That said, the UK banking sector remains heavily socialised; a reminder of the near-death situation that threatened last autumn. And its capacity and willingness to lend remains severely impaired by the legacy of its previous excesses.

The state of the real economy is a different matter altogether. Over the past year, the British economy contracted by 5.6 per cent and it is expected that GDP will fall by 4-5 per cent over the course of 2009. Projections for the American, European and Japanese economies remain firmly in negative territory for this year, with close to zero growth predicted for 2010. A recent report suggested that British living standards would not recover to early 2008 levels until 2013, a scenario which bears strong echoes of the 1930s. The general picture now emerging suggests that for the indefinite future western economies will be characterised by extremely low growth rates. We might avoid a 1930s depression, but far from having a V-shaped recession, or even a U-shaped one, we might be contemplating something more like an L-shape. High unemployment levels, excess capacity, severe contraction in private spending levels and huge fiscal deficits are likely for the next five years, if not longer.

Even this rather bleak prognosis should not blind us to the possibility of something worse. Two leading American economic historians, Barry Eichengreen and Kevin H O'Rourke, have argued in their recent paper, "A Tale of Two Depressions", that "world industrial production continues to track closely the 1930s fall". Both world stock markets and world trade "are still following paths far below the ones they followed in the Great Depression", and the United States and Canada "continue to see their industrial output fall approximately in line with what happened in the 1929 crisis". They conclude: "Globally, we are tracking or doing even worse than the Great Depression, whether the metric is industrial production, exports or equity valuations ..."

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If uncertainty still surrounds the economic outlook, it is possible to speak with much greater assurance about two other aspects of the financial crisis: the political response to the failure of the banks and the economic fortunes of China in the wake of the western financial meltdown. Last autumn it seemed possible--if a little unlikely--that the US and UK governments might act to reform the financial sector. This has proved to be a chimera. Huge banks continue to combine both their traditional high street functions and the casino activities that brought them to their knees.

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