Who's Your No.1 Scot? Here Are the Nominees-Now Tells Us the People's Choice for Stv Poll

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), September 1, 2009 | Go to article overview

Who's Your No.1 Scot? Here Are the Nominees-Now Tells Us the People's Choice for Stv Poll


Byline: Tom Hamilton

WHAT? No Connery.No Law, Dalglish or Baxter.And no Mary, Queen of Scots or Annie Lennox.

They've all been snubbed by a panel of experts appointed to help find The Greatest Scot of all time.

The final decision will be announced in an STV spectacular on St Andrew's Day as part of the Year of Homecoming celebrations.

But Record readers will have a big say in the final outcome.

And you'll have the chance to add five more People's Choice nominations to the existing shortlist.

The panel's choices form a distinguished list that is bound to spark a lengthy national debate - partly due to who has been rejected.

Many are dead and most are men.

There are fewmodern day entertainers. And the absence of some great footballing names is bound to attract controversy.

The selection panel who drew up the list of 30 included: ex-LibDem leader Sir Menzies Campbell, ex-footballer and pundit Pat Nevin, polar explorer Louise Scott, historian Thomas Devine, Edinburgh Festival director Jonathan Mills, entrepreneur Hamira Khan and Record editor BruceWaddell.

The process to select The Greatest Scot gets under way with a series of one-hour programmes on STV from Monday, November 9 to Friday, November 13 from 9-10pm.

After the shows go out, viewers will have the chance to vote with the overall winner announced during a special 30-minute programme on St Andrew's Day.

And you can have a major influence on the outcome and make sure five popular People's Choice candidates are considered when it comes time to vote. You can nominate until September 11.

Before you make your choice, have a look at who's missing: Mary Slessor (1848 - 1915): The Dundee mill girl who became a missionary in West Africa. Called "Great Mother" by Nigerians, she provided healthcare and education and stamped out human sacrifice.

Elsie Inglis (1864 - 1917): A leading surgeon and suffragette. She improved maternity facilities and fought for better healthcare for women in Scotland.

Sean Connery (1930 - ) He achieved worldwide fame in 1962 as the first big-screen James Bond. Since then, he has been one of the most successful film actors in the world.

Kenny Dalglish (1951 - ) Born in Glasgow, he played for Celtic and Liverpool. Won the league and European cups several times and became successful player-manager. He was capped 102 times.

Dennis Law (1940 - ) The King won 55 caps and hit 30 goals for Scotland as well as 227 goals in club matches.

Jim Baxter (1939-2001) Considered by some to be the finest player this country has produced. He scored both goals when Scotland beat England 2-1 win in 1963 and at Wembley and played keepy-uppy during a 3-2 victory over the World Cup winners in 1967.

Sir Harry Lauder (1870 - 1950): World-famous singer and music hall entertainer. Did much to foster an image of Scots as kilt-wearing, whisky drinking and careful with money.

Lulu (Marie McDonald Lawrie) (1948 - ): Pop singer, entertainer and TV personality, born in Glasgow. Hits include Shout.

Annie Lennox ( 1954 - ) Probably the most successful ever Scottish female recording artist. Embarked on a solo career after huge success with The Eurythmics in the 1980s.

Kirkpatrick Macmillan (1813 - 1878) Invented the bicycle but never patented it.

Mary, Queen of Scots (1542 - 1587): Last Roman Catholic monarch of Scotland. Although remembered as a heroic figure, she was a poor ruler. After religious disputes with John Knox and political intrigue, she was imprisoned and forced to abdicate in 1567 in favour of her son JamesVI, then executed for treason.

DrWilliam McEwan (1827 - 1913): Brewer and philanthropist. Born in Alloa, McEwan set up his Fountain Brewery in Edinburgh in 1856. He later entered parliament and gave big donations to Edinburgh.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832) Patriot, writer and poet.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Who's Your No.1 Scot? Here Are the Nominees-Now Tells Us the People's Choice for Stv Poll
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.