The Learning Organization Implemented in Education through Advisory Committees

By Davis, Jason Lee; Davis, Harley | Education, Fall 2009 | Go to article overview

The Learning Organization Implemented in Education through Advisory Committees


Davis, Jason Lee, Davis, Harley, Education


The Learning Organization Implemented in Education Through Advisory Committees

As secondary and post-secondary educational institutions enter the twenty first century there is a growing challenge to deliver education that continues to meet the global work force needs. In response to this challenge, should advisory committees be expected to assume more responsibility within educational institutions? Career and technology advisory committees have a long history as effective components of education. To enhance effectiveness as change agents, should advisory committees in education be reengineered to follow the lead of business and industry and integrate the relatively new concept of the learning organization into their operating framework?

Passage of the Smith-Hughes Act in 1917, was the first legislative action that promoted the use of local program advisory committees in the area of vocational and technical education. The Act encouraged use of citizen advisory groups to assist in planning and evaluating vocational programs and to establish communication links between schools and communities. The concept and basic framework of advisory committees is as appropriate today as it was in the early twentieth century. During the 90 years since passage of the Smith-Hughes Act, secondary and postsecondary educational institutions have made use of advisory committees to maintain close ties to the local, state, national, and global community. To maintain this link to the community, advisory committees must be representative of all stakeholders. Comprehensive teams within learning organizations are more inclusive of the members' personal contributions and collective experiences in defining and reaching the goals of the organization.

Peter Senge (1990), Director for the Center for Organizational Learning, Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, assembled the collaborative works of several of his colleagues into a composite that was the philosophical base for the concept of the learning organization. At the center of the concept of the learning organization is team learning. In his work, The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization, he describes the concept of the "learning organization" as being the composite of five disciplines. The disciplines of the learning organization are systems thinking, personal mastery, mental models, building shared vision, and team learning. He considered systems thinking as being necessary for the functioning of the other four. Senge defines the learning organization as "a place where people are continually discovering how they create their reality and how they can change it" (p. 13). Additionally, he envisions the learning organization as "an organization that is continually expanding its capacity to create its future" (p. 14). He further described the learning organization as individuals connected together as a community. The community concept increases the capacity of an organization to embrace synergy--the premise that the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. Senge, Kleiner, Roberts, Ross, & Smith (1994) envision the five disciplines as tools to increase the capacity of individuals as well as teams:

Personal Mastery--learning to expand our personal capacity to create the results we most desire, and creating an organizational environment which encourages all its members to develop themselves toward the goals and purposes they choose.

Mental Models--reflecting upon, continually clarifying, and improving our internal pictures of the world, and seeing how they shape our actions and decisions.

Shared Visions--building a sense of commitment in a group, by developing shared images of the future we seek to create, and the principles and guiding practices by which we hope to get there.

Team Learning--transforming conversational and collective thinking skills, so that groups of people can reliably develop intelligence and ability greater than the sum of individual members' talents.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Learning Organization Implemented in Education through Advisory Committees
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.