Cooking Away Cancer Risk; Recipes for Prostate Health That Could Help Keep a Killer at Bay

Daily Mail (London), September 12, 2009 | Go to article overview
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Cooking Away Cancer Risk; Recipes for Prostate Health That Could Help Keep a Killer at Bay


Byline: Fiona MacRae Science Reporter

A COOKBOOK of recipes designed to keep prostate cancer at bay has been compiled by experts.

The Prostate Care Cookbook is the first to show how to put into practice the many scientific studies into the effects of diet on the disease.

Written by dieticians and nutritionists, it contains 50 pages of advice on different food groups, followed by dozens of recipes, including some from professional chefs such as Antony Worrall Thompson.

Foods believed to prevent the cancer or stop its growth include garlic and other members of the allium vegetable family such as onions, as well as vegetables such as broccoli or cauliflower.

In one study, men who ate the highest levels of allium vegetables were almost half as likely to develop prostate cancer than those who ate the least.

Professor Rayman, the book's lead author, and a professor of nutritional medicine, said that men should eat at least three cloves of garlic a week or have at least three servings of onions, spring onions, shallots, leeks and chives. How they are prepared is also important, because cooking allium vegetables can destroy many of their cancer-fighting qualities.

Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts may prevent the disease from spreading throughout the body, studies suggest. These should be raw or lightly cooked and any water from steaming or boiling incorporated into gravies or sauces. The book advises three to five helpings a week.

Tomatoes may also help keep prostate cancer at bay. In one study, levels of a protein linked to the growth of the cancer fell by a fifth in men who had pasta with tomato sauce daily for five weeks.

The benefits are thought to come from lycopene, the pigment that gives tomatoes their red colour. It is quickly used by the body, so ideally men should include tomatoes in their diet each day.

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