The House of Blues Foundation

American Visions, June-July 1998 | Go to article overview

The House of Blues Foundation


Committed not only to profit, but also to the spirit and traditions of the Mississippi Delta and--through its foundation arm--to promoting racial harmony and educating public school students about blues culture, House of Blues Entertainment Inc. sometimes seems a 20th-century counterpart to Robert Owen's New Lanark experiment, which sought to unite capitalist enterprise with social reform. Backed by investment from a rock group (Aerosmith), singers (John Fogerty, Isaac Hayes, Carly Simon, Joe Walsh), actors (Dan Ackroyd, James Belushi, Dennis Hopper, George Wendt), the Harvard University Endowment Fund and the Walt Disney Corporation, the enterprise has grown from a club into a conglomerate--with a retail company, a music company, a hospitality arm (soon to open its first hotel, in Chicago) and a media company, all built upon the foundation (some critics have said on the back) of the blues and the Southern black experience.

The International House of Blues Foundation runs a host of programs that foster an appreciation of the music, art and history of the blues and of the culture that spawned this authentic American art form. From Blues Schoolhouse (three days a week, House of Blues clubs are open as multimedia classrooms and folk art museums for students in grades 5 through 12) through Blues Ambassador Scholarships (which annually sponsor four college-bound students) to Summer Blues (which introduces 8- to 18-year-olds to folk art via participation in hands-on projects led by guest artists), the foundation has jumped in to counteract the radical diminution of arts education in public schools. Other House of Blues initiatives designed for the same purpose include the Artists in Residence program (which sends musicians, visual artists and writers to local high schools to interact with students) and Arts in the House (which provides Chicago-area students with hands-on art instruction from resident artists).

For more than a year now, the International House of Blues Foundation has been run by Carol Adams, a former academician and activist who has a proselytizer's passion about the value of arts to community and individual development. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The House of Blues Foundation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.