A Reagan Oral History

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 17, 2009 | Go to article overview

A Reagan Oral History


Byline: Peter Hannaford, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Beginning in 2001, scholars of the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia conducted an oral history of Ronald Reagan's political years, beginning with his first campaign for governor of California through his last public speech in 1993. The project consisted of extensive interviews of 46 men and women who had worked closely with Mr. Reagan, including chiefs of staff, Cabinet secretaries, senators, military officials, campaign advisers and behind-the-scenes people who played important roles.

Each set of interviews covered a day to a day-and-half and were conducted by teams of scholars. These weren't quiz-type interviews. Instead, the interviews would ask triggering questions, then let the interviewee reminisce at length.

Stephen F. Knott was co-chairman of the Presidential Oral History Program at the Miller Center. Jeffrey L. Chidester is now its chairman of the National Discussion and Debate Series. Together they have written this book which is unique among the approximately 100 books that have been published about the 40th president.

Mr. Knott and Mr. Chidester provide the narrative thread, following the Reagan career highlights in chronological order. That alone would not have been remarkable, for the main facts are well-known. Their contribution was to intersperse their narrative with quotations - short and long - from the oral history interviewees. These comments provide colorful, lively texture to the Reagan story. Here are insights into his thinking, his character and his management style.

The tension, uncertainty and confusion that attended the first few hours after the president had been shot by John Hinckley Jr. puts the reader right in the Situation Room of the White House, with first-person comments by many of the leading participants.

The Iran-Contra issue erupted late in President Reagan's second term. Looking back on it, the late Lyn Nofziger trenchantly observed, I suspect he had a lot of self-doubt about Iran-Contra. What people don't really understand is that by the time that [Iran-Contra] came along, Reagan was dealing with people who didn't know him and he didn't know them. They had come into the second administration and had no idea how he thought or how he worked. …

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