Emma Heads Up Research Team

The Journal (Newcastle, England), September 18, 2009 | Go to article overview

Emma Heads Up Research Team


EMMA Dallolio has joined Newcastle research agency Explain as head of quantitative research. Emma previously worked for Acritas prior to her new appointment and before that spent several years as research manager at Greggs.

The new role was created as part of Explain's planned growth which has seen the company double its turnover in the last two years. As a consequence it has split all research carried out into two strands of expertise covering quantitative and qualitative methods.

Emma's responsibilities will include managing a team of five quantitative researchers and a team of 14 telephone researchers based at Explain's new CATI centre in South Gosforth, which opened last month.

She will also develop retail research which is expected to grow again in 2010 after a very poor two years with the downturn in consumer spending.

Emma said: "Explain's exceptional growth has led to a number of strategic changes and it is such a fantastic opportunity for me to be an integral part of that. I'm thrilled to be joining them at such an exciting time and to be part of a successful and friendly team, working with well known organisations, in a range of industry sectors, across the UK.

"As well as heading up the quantitative research, part of my role will be to draw on my previous experiences and branch into new sectors; it's a challenge that I'm really looking forward to. …

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