Boy, Three, in Hospital with E.coli ... Weeks after He Fought off Swine Flu

The Evening Standard (London, England), September 17, 2009 | Go to article overview

Boy, Three, in Hospital with E.coli ... Weeks after He Fought off Swine Flu


Byline: Sophie Goodchild health editor

A boy of three became the latest victim of the E.coli outbreak only weeks after recovering from swine flu.

Harry Dolby, from Sidcup, developed E.coli on Sunday and is being kept on a drip in an isolation unit in hospital. His condition is said to be deteriorating.

His parents Lee and Louise, both 27, said Harry had just recovered from swine flu and was in hospital for a week this summer after choking on a sausage.

Mr Dolby said: "It's not fair. He has battled so much. He is in a very ill, panicking state."

It is thought Harry caught E.coli at Godstone Farm in Surrey, which has closed as a result of the outbreak.

The number of cases linked to the petting farm is now 40, with 14 children being treated in hospital. Four are seriously ill, seven others are stable and three are improving.

The outbreak is believed to have started on 8 August but it is thought that E.coli's long incubation period meant the Health Protection Agency did not learn about the first possible case connected to the farm until 27 August.

The Conservatives have called for an independent inquiry amid fears that tens of thousands of children could have been exposed to the bug since it was identified.

Fears about the outbreak grew as health chiefs admitted swine flu could affect britain for the next three or four years. They urged Londoners not to be complacent and to get vaccinated against the disease -- especially the young and the elderly. …

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