Job-Seekers, Others Rediscover Free Technology, Resources at Local Libraries

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 18, 2009 | Go to article overview

Job-Seekers, Others Rediscover Free Technology, Resources at Local Libraries


Technology resources at your public library are being used more than ever now, mostly due to the harsh problems associated with the recession, according to local libraries as well as the American Library Association.

The association released a report this week that showed 66 percent of public libraries nationwide rank job-seeking services, including resume writing and Internet job searches, as the most crucial online services they offer. ThatAEs up 44 percent from two years ago.

Libraries have become crucial technology hubs for people needing free Web access and the power behind it.

"Like many libraries across the country, Illinois libraries reported an increase in their Internet connection speeds over the previous year," said ALA spokeswoman Macey Morales.

It wasnAEt enough, however, to keep up with demand. About 38 percent of public libraries report their Internet connection speeds are adequate to meet patron demands at all times of the day, compared with 55 percent that reported this was the case in the 2007-2008 report, she said.

Illinois libraries also reported a big jump in helping patrons understand and use online information: 77 percent this year, compared with 63 percent last year.

The Arlington Heights Memorial Library also knows much of this firsthand.

Arlington Heights started Internet-related job search programs earlier this year, including e-Resumes, "Beyond Monster.com," and "Introduction to e-Mail." It also started a special jobs desk that offers classes regarding online forms and other programs.

Since March, 1,172 people had questions related to finding a job, 255 sought resume reviews and 92 attended the "Beyond Monster.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Job-Seekers, Others Rediscover Free Technology, Resources at Local Libraries
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.