Editorials from around USA Take the Measure of a Kennedy

Editor & Publisher, August 28, 2009 | Go to article overview

Editorials from around USA Take the Measure of a Kennedy


A collection of editorials from around the U.S. on the passing of Sen. Edward Kennedy, as edited by McClatchy-Tribune News Service. *

The following editorial appeared in the Kansas City Star on Thursday, Aug. 27:

HEALTH CARE FOR ALL WOULD BE A FINE TRIBUTE TO KENNEDY

There's a simple and appropriate way to honor Ted Kennedy.

After 46 years as a U.S. senator from Massachusetts, Kennedy died Tuesday as federal legislation on his greatest passion - universal health care - is struggling in Congress.

Congress, in the spirit of bipartisanship for which Kennedy was known, needs now to pass health care reform.

His greatest strength as a legislator was his ability to reach across the aisle, to compromise and get important work done. This quality is sorely lacking today in Washington, which is mired in partisanship.

Kennedy represented an increasingly, and sadly, rare Washington collegiality and practicality. With former Republican Sen. Nancy Kassebaum of Kansas, he sponsored the 1996 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

Sen. Sam Brownback, a Kansas Republican, said Wednesday of Kennedy, "Despite our political differences, he was professional, courteous and thoughtful, and always looked for ways to find common ground."

Through the years, health care had been Kennedy's great mission. From helping establish the national community health system in 1966, to programs helping children, seniors and those living with HIV/AIDS, Kennedy returned again and again to the idea that health care is a right, not a luxury.

Even his political enemies, those who used him as a liberal boogeyman and focused on the tragedy of Chappaquiddick, will miss him. Was there a better foil for conservatives these last several decades?

The hope among those who appreciate him, though, must be to push forward on legislation he had hoped would be his legacy. There is no more fitting tribute to Kennedy than passing universal health care.

The following editorial appeared in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on Thursday, Aug. 27:

THE FLAWED GIANT

Madison Square Garden was stiflingly hot on the night of Aug. 12, 1980. The long Democratic presidential primary campaign had ended bitterly, with President Jimmy Carter beating back a surprisingly inept challenge by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts. The only drama remaining for the divided and disgruntled delegations to the party's national convention was seeing how Kennedy would react.

He spoke for 34 minutes, mentioning Carter's name only in the 32nd minute. The rest of his speech was a ringing restatement of liberal ideas as the core of Democratic Party principles and utter disdain of what Republicans and their newly chosen nominee, Ronald Reagan of California, stood for.

It was a masterpiece of political rhetoric, the finest speech Ted Kennedy ever gave, best remembered for its stirring final line: "For all those whose cares have been our concern, the work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives, and the dream shall never die."

It was Kennedyism at its best and at its worst: inspirational and eloquent, but vindictive and self-absorbed. It did nothing to help Carter's chances against Reagan that fall. The way it turned out, probably nothing could have.

On that night, Edward M. Kennedy abandoned presidential politics and gave the rest of his life to the larger mission of advancing liberal goals. The dynasty that bullets and bad judgment denied gave way to a larger cause. With his death late Tuesday night at age 77, progressivism lost its greatest champion since Franklin D. Roosevelt.

He was the youngest of Joe and Rose Kennedy's nine children, never a part of the old man's grand plans, the jock who was kicked out of Harvard for cheating and who scored a touchdown against Yale after being readmitted.

During Jack's 1960 presidential campaign, his father sent him to coordinate the Democrat-poor Western states, after which he was handed Jack's Senate seat as soon he reached 30. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Editorials from around USA Take the Measure of a Kennedy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.