Internet Resources for Historical Research in Music Education

By Hash, Phillip M. | Journal of Historical Research in Music Education, October 2009 | Go to article overview

Internet Resources for Historical Research in Music Education


Hash, Phillip M., Journal of Historical Research in Music Education


The amount of primary source material available on the Internet has increased a great deal in the past few years. While the need to roll up our sleeves and dig through dusty files and boxes will (hopefully) never disappear, the World Wide Web can be a useful tool in locating sources that may have otherwise gone undiscovered. The following list provides several web sites and databases I have found useful while conducting historical research in music education. If you know of others, please contact me at pmh3@calvin.edu and JRHME will publish them in a future edition. Happy hunting!

Google Book Search http://books.google.com/

This search engine finds books that have been scanned and made available on the Internet. One can, for example, find PDF files of Lowell Mason's Song Garden (bk. 2), the Progressive Music Series, Tuft's and Holt's Normal Music Course, Jepson's Standard Music Reader, and Luther Whiting Mason's National Music Course.

Internet Archive http://www.archive.org

This site searches digitized material on the Internet. Many sources can be viewed as PDF, HTML, or in flip book format. Examples include volumes of proceedings by the National Education Association and an audio file from the Siegel-Myers School of Music.

Mirlyn Catalog at the University of Michigan Library http://mirlyn.lib.umich.edu/F/?func=file&file_name=find-b

This search engine identifies a number of digital sources available without a password from the University of Michigan or outside sources. Search results often link back to Google Books or other Internet-based sites, but is sometimes more thorough and organized than the original source. A link to the Hathi Trust Digital Library, for example, located School Music Monthly, published by P. C. Hayden, in digitized format from 1900-1908.

Library of Congress Digital Collections www.loc.gov

The digital collections offered by the Library of Congress allow historical researchers to view primary source materials in the form of sheet music, audio files, and photographs. Band historians will especially enjoy collections devoted to African American band composers, Civil War band music, and J. P. Sousa. Each of these collections offers complete sets of parts to a number of band and orchestra compositions from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Band Music PDF Library http://www.bandmusicpdf.org/

The Band Music PDF Library offers more than 400 public domain titles from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries for free download. This music may be used for performing, research, or as authentic material for arrangers to set for modern bands. Users are encouraged to create and submit full scores and transposed [D.sup.b] piccolo and [E.sup.b] horn parts for modern instruments. When available, biographical information on composers and arrangers is included with the set of parts. New titles are added each month.

The Making of America http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/moagrp/

This database is a digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology. The collection currently contains approximately 10,000 books and 50,000 journal articles.

International Music Score Library Project/Petrucci Music Library http://imslp.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Internet Resources for Historical Research in Music Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.