Tony's Flower Filled Memorial Garden; BOTANY

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), September 25, 2009 | Go to article overview

Tony's Flower Filled Memorial Garden; BOTANY


ATHOUSAND spring bulbs were planted as a special tribute to an eco-hero whose achievements ranked him alongside Charles Darwin. Tony Bradshaw was Professor of Botany at Liverpool University and was internationally acclaimed for his research and environmental work.

In July 2008, he became Liverpool's first ever Citizen of Honour for his contribution to urban ecology and restoration. He died in August 2008 at the age of 82.

To mark his achievements, 1,000 snowdrop bulbs have been planted in St James' Gardens - an area Professor Bradshaw himself transformed when he set up a dedicated friends group for the garden who undertook new planting and created a wildlife haven.

The planting ceremony was led by Tim Smit, founder of the Eden Project, who was himself heavily influenced by Professor Bradshaw.

Tim was joined by Tony's three daughters and children from Christ The King Centre For Learning to mark the life of a great man with the thing he loved most - flowers.

During his lifetime, Tony was involved with many environmental organisations, including the first Groundwork Trust, set up in St Helens in 1981.

The model was so successful there are now more than 50 Groundwork Trusts in the UK, focused on communities where environmental dereliction goes hand-in-hand with social and economic deprivation. …

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