College Students' Perception of Electronic Commerce and Internet Purchasing

By Lee, Huei; Mayer, Bradley et al. | Academy of Information and Management Sciences Journal, January 1999 | Go to article overview

College Students' Perception of Electronic Commerce and Internet Purchasing


Lee, Huei, Mayer, Bradley, Yang, Jiaqin, Chen, Kuo-Lane, Lee, Chris, Academy of Information and Management Sciences Journal


INTRODUCTION

Advances in microprocessor and communication technology during the last few years has made the Internet the most challenging area in the field of management information systems. Today, millions of people have become aware of the usefulness of e-mail and the Internet for accessing information through PC-modem and telephone lines. The Internet is a computer network connecting more than one hundred thousand individual networks all over the world (Laudon & Laudon, 1996; 1997). Using the Internet, people communicate through e-mail, Usenet Newsgroup, chatting, FTP, Telnet, and World Wide Web (WWW). Millions of web sites have been created for commercial and educational purposes (Lee, Osborne, & Chen, 1996).

The Internet has been used in defense and academic research for many years. The commercial use of the Internet, also referred to as electronic commerce or e-commerce, was not permitted until the early 1990s because the government subsidized the Internet (McKeown & Watson; 1997). Forrester Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts expects online sales to increase from $4.8 billion in 1998 to $17 billion in the year 2001 (Furger, 1998). Why is the Internet becoming a powerful tool for marketing and communication? There are many reasons, the main one being that the Internet connects more than 40 million people from 100 countries. Consumers can access information from a remote location through the Internet if they are connected to a telephone line or a network. Another reason that the Internet is becoming a powerful tool for marketing and communication is that it provides a variety of services. For example, e-mail provides communication between consumers and companies, and through electronic data interchange (EDI), buyers and sellers can exchange standard business transaction documents such as invoices or purchase orders. Finally, the ability to combine video clips into the Internet is a significant step in establishing Internet marketing as a powerful communication forum.

The purpose of this research paper is to investigate the perceptions of college students on the uses and successes/failures of Internet purchasing and the concept of electronic commerce. College students represent individuals who are more knowledgeable in technology than individuals in previous generations. This study provides information related to the following research questions:

1. What are the primary functions of college students in using the Internet for purchasing products or services?

2. What are the obstacles to consumer purchasing on the Internet? Is security a primary concern as suggested in the literature? Can different payments be used to avoid the security problems?

3. Which presentation format (hypertext, audio, or video form) in Internet marketing is the most persuasive to consumers?

4. How often do college students use the Internet? How long do college students use the Internet per week (e.g., checking product information)?

5. What products are popular in Internet purchasing and communications?

6. What are the characteristics of the students who use the Internet to purchase products and services?

LITERATURE REVIEW

Numerous studies have been written about the Internet. Many of these studies focus on technical topics, case studies., and the use of the Internet for educational purposes (Carroll, 1994; Kanuk, 1996; Vernon, 1996; Ullman, William & Emal, 1996; Mahmoon & Hirt, 1995). Knowledge about the Internet, however, is still in the early stages simply because the Internet has become popular only in the last few years. While a fair amount of case studies in e-commerce (e.g., Amazon.com) have been discussed, (Hitt, Ireland,& Hoskisson, 1998), few empirical studies have concentrated on the theoretical construction of using the Internet for consumer purchasing. Technical barriers such as speed, security and maintenance are the main concerns in using the Internet in marketing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

College Students' Perception of Electronic Commerce and Internet Purchasing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.