A Corporate Human Resource Approach to Evaluating University Faculty: Lessons in Development and Communication

By Lucas, John J.; Feldman, Lori S. et al. | Academy of Educational Leadership Journal, May 2001 | Go to article overview

A Corporate Human Resource Approach to Evaluating University Faculty: Lessons in Development and Communication


Lucas, John J., Feldman, Lori S., Empey, Philip H., Academy of Educational Leadership Journal


INTRODUCTION

Today, performance plans and evaluations are common Human Resource practice in corporate America. In the 2000 society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and Personnel Decision International (PDI) survey, 85% of the respondent organizations had some type of annual employee performance plan (www.shrm.org). A typical component of an employee performance plan is the performance appraisal. Simply stated, a performance appraisal is a systematic approach that measures an employee's work performance. Additionally, organizations use the performance appraisal for decision making in human resource planning, recruiting, selecting, career planning and development, and human resource administration (Caruth and Handlogten 1997). This paper will examine the design and communications of a faculty evaluation system that reflects the HR practice of performance plans and evaluations prevalent in corporate America.

ASSESSMENT OF THE PRESENT SYSTEM

In the Fall of 2000, a special task force, referred to herein as, the "faculty evaluation committee," was created within the School of Management at Purdue University Calumet. This faculty evaluation committee was given the directive to design and communicate an effective performance appraisal system. The committee consisted of three faculty members representing the areas of accounting, human resources, and marketing. The three members were carefully selected to serve on the committee because of his or her area of expertise that would play a critical role to the design and implementation of the faculty evaluation system. Additionally, they would represent the major areas of faculty as a whole with their varying needs and concerns.

The committee agreed that their primary mission was to design a faculty evaluation process that reflected the value each tenure track or tenured faculty member contributed to the overall success and growth of the school. Other goals included: the development of a process that was perceived as fair and just by the faculty; the inclusion of accountability and feedback of the performance for each faculty member; and the development of a standardized evaluation form to rank faculty members.

The initial step of any planned change is to assess the present situation and to identify any deficiencies. The committee first reviewed the faculty evaluation system that is currently used in the School. Each faculty member is expected to submit an annual activity report outlining his or her goals and professional accomplishments. Although there is no standardized form, the annual report is expected to include: progress toward the accomplishment of professional goals from the previous years' annual report, teaching activities and evaluations, scholarship, university and community service, and projected goals for the upcoming year.

The annual report is then evaluated by a committee of three elected faculty members who evaluate the performance of each faculty member and submit their recommendations to advise the school head in the merit pay allocation decision. The committee generally uses the three areas of teaching, research, and service to establish their rankings. This committee is purely advisory; however, and the school head is not obligated to heed the advice given. The faculty member receives feedback regarding his or her performance via the next annual contract that reflects the new salary.

The present system provides no formal two-way communication between the school head or the evaluation committee and individual faculty members. It is perceived that the increased communications between the individual faculty member and the school head would increase the ability of the faculty member to understand the goals of the department as well as understand the "value added" of each faculty member in relation to the merit-based pay decision process. After reviewing the current system, the committee also conducted an investigation of the faculty evaluation process of other schools within the University and also other colleges and universities throughout the United States.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Corporate Human Resource Approach to Evaluating University Faculty: Lessons in Development and Communication
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.