Foreign Policy: Whose Ball Is It Anyway?

By Lucier, James P. | Insight on the News, June 29, 1998 | Go to article overview

Foreign Policy: Whose Ball Is It Anyway?


Lucier, James P., Insight on the News


Presidents long have sparred with Congress about who Has greater say in the foreign affairs of the United States. Maybe the Founding Fathers wanted it that way.

When House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia visited Jerusalem last month, he told members of Israel's parliament, the Knesset, that "We in Congress ... stand with you today in recognizing Jerusalem as the united and eternal capital of Israel."

Indeed, Gingrich safely could make that statement because he is a cosponsor, along with House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt of Missouri, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott of Mississippi and Senate Minority Leader Thomas A. Daschle of South Dakota, of legislation calling upon President Clinton and the secretary of state to affirm publicly as a matter of U.S. policy that Jerusalem must remain the undivided capital of the state of Israel.

Of course, this is exactly the opposite of the policy espoused by the president and Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. "I think it's unfortunate that the speaker, in a range of matters related to foreign policy, has injected a high degree of partisanship into his comments," said White House spokesman Michael McCurry. Other comments from supporters of the president resurrected complaints that partisanship should stop at the water's edge.

Yet what was at issue was not so much partisanship -- a significant majority of both parties supports the Jerusalem bill -- but the ongoing struggle between Congress and the White House for control of foreign policy. President after president boldly has asserted that Congress has no business getting involved in foreign relations at all, while nearly every Congress has believed the Constitution gives the legislative branch broad reach into nearly every aspect of policymaking.

Surprisingly, the Constitution itself says very little about which branch has responsibility for foreign policy. In Article II, Section 1, the executive power is vested in the president, without further explanation. Section 2 makes him "Commander in Chief" of the military forces, and gives him power "by and with the advice and consent of the Senate" to make treaties and to appoint ambassadors. The only other power clearly touching on foreign affairs is the authority to "receive ambassadors and other public ministers." By contrast the Congress is given much more specific authority in Article 1, Section 8: "Congress shall have power ... to provide for the common defense ... to regulate commerce with foreign nations ... to define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas and offenses against the Law of nations, to declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water, to raise and support armies . …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Foreign Policy: Whose Ball Is It Anyway?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.