D-Day for Data

By Darby, Ian | Marketing, June 25, 1998 | Go to article overview

D-Day for Data


Darby, Ian, Marketing


A partnership between database companies and their suppliers is key to dodging the pitfalls of the Millennium Bug.

With less than 18 months to go before many computer chips trip up over the calendar change from 99 to 00, the government's task force, Action 2000, has already hired an agency, FCA, to handle a [pounds]10m campaign alerting businesses to the dangers of the Millennium Bug (Marketing, last week).

On the face of it, the direct marketing industry will hit more year 2000 date-change problems than most. From the mainframe systems and in-house databases held by clients, down to mailing and fulfilment houses, it is driven at every level by computer systems.

Martin Bartle, spokesman at the Direct Marketing Association (DMA), says: "Because the industry is data-driven it is essential things are addressed. This is the same for any industry reliant on IT. You can never be sure whether there is a little glitch somewhere or not. My advice is to be as thorough as possible."

James Wilkinson, vice-president of TSC Europe, which specialises in consultancy for call centres and other direct marketing companies, warns that the biggest problem for the direct marketing industry will be from erroneous data entering systems from external sources.

Many direct marketing supply companies, however, have already taken the issue in hand. Mark Patron, managing director of Claritas, which holds lifestyle data on millions of UK households, says the company set up a year 2000 project task team, to operate on a European basis, at the beginning of last year.

Large client companies with customer databases also seem to be well aware of the problem. Judith Thorne, marketing director of Air Miles, says that as the company takes bookings in advance, it had to start investigating whether it could be affected by the bug early on. "From the first of January 1999 we are taking bookings for the year 2000, so it was critical we addressed the problem early. We started looking at the issue four years ago," she says.

The DMA recommends Suppliers and clients establish a high-level team dedicated to this one problem. "Such a team must not be distracted by other responsibilities," warns Bartle.

In theory, the solutions appear to be fairly straightforward, but they can be labour intensive. They involve either rewriting computer code, adding an extra two digits to any dates contained, or replacing the entire database system if it is not compliant.

Paul Robinson, director at computer supplier Strategic Data Management, says: "Anything PC-based will be OK unless the machines are really archaic. But clients using mainframes may face problems." Most PCs bought after 1995 should be compliant.

Thorne says the findings of Air Miles' Millennium project resulted in a decision to bring in new systems before 2000. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

D-Day for Data
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.