Nothing Childish about Robotics

Manila Bulletin, October 6, 2009 | Go to article overview
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Nothing Childish about Robotics


With the latest trend in robotics as showcased by student whizzes at the 8th Philippine Robotics Olympiad (PRO) recently, robots indeed are not just for kids.The recent PRO, held at SM North Edsa, has given birth to another batch of future scientists and engineers of the country. It gathered the brightest students in the field of science and technology, and challenged them to craft highly innovative robots and robotic systems using Lego robotics.Nothing about robotics is childish, says PRO organizer FELTA Multi-media Inc. president and CEO Mylene Abiva. “The Robotics Olympiad challenges the intellectual skills and critical thinking of more than 300 elementary and high school students from both public and private schools. Students learn simple engineering, computer programming, mathematics and of course, the values of teamwork, fair play and discipline.”PRO supports the Philippine’s aggressive campaign towards the promotion of science and technology interests among the youth, particularly, in robotics as one of the new alternative media of effective learning. “We want to integrate an interplay of instructivism and constructivism as an effective medium in teaching robotics towards the discovery of promising robotics-scientists,” Abiva adds.Winners will compose the Philippine Robotics Team that will represent the country at the World Robotics Olympiad 2009 in Gyeongbuk Pohang, Korea in November.BATTLE OF THE ROBOTSThe technical know-how of the participants were tested in the Iron Robot Triathlon category for nine elementary teams, and in Robot Match group for 29 high school teams. Fourteen high school teams, on the other hand, participated in the Open category, where robots were programmed to do creative things like sing, dance, and even draw or paint.In the elementary level, Regular category, Claret School of Quezon City Team B bagged the first place, followed by Grace Christian College Team B. In the high school level, Philippine Science High School Bicol Team B went home as first placers followed by Science and Technology Education Center Team A.

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Nothing Childish about Robotics
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