Brush with Genius; Sally Hoban Looks at the Work of One of Birmingham's Finest Painters

The Birmingham Post (England), October 9, 2009 | Go to article overview

Brush with Genius; Sally Hoban Looks at the Work of One of Birmingham's Finest Painters


Byline: Sally Hoban

Successful collectors and antique dealers share the ability to be able to predict which antiques to invest in that will go up in value in the future. The same is true for the art market.

Canny collectors buying the work of an exceptional artist early in their career, or before prices for their works start to rise, will very often reap the rewards of their investment in the future. The secret is to look for quality and originality.

Collectors in the 50s, 60s and 70s buying the work of late 19th and early 20th century artists from Birmingham were doing precisely this. Over the past few years, despite the uncertain economic climate, the work of Victorian and Edwardian painters from Birmingham has continued to rise in popularity in the collectors' market.

In 2006 for example, a private collection of the work of the Birmingham artist Joseph Southall (1861-1944) which was amassed over many years by an eccentric and reclusive Halesowen pensioner came under the hammer at Christie's auctioneers and sold for more than double their estimates, with several selling for in excess of pounds 10,000.

This sale was an early indicator of the growing popularity of Birmingham artists and set a precedent for the prices for Southall's work, so if you have a painting or drawing by him hiding in your attic you could be sitting on a valuable treasure.

If you'd like to invest in an example of his work, the Fine Art Society in London has a couple of Southall works for sale - with the price for each on application.

Southall is perhaps the best known artist from the Birmingham Group of painters. The jewel-like, enamel qualities of his frescoes and paintings are instantly recognisable. Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery has an outstanding collection of his work on permanent show, with one of his best works situated at the top of the entrance stairs to the main art gallery.

Simply titled Corporation Street, Birmingham, in March 1914, this supreme example of fresco painting gives us an outstanding snapshot of life in the city before the First World War.

Southall worked on this commission during the winter of 1915-16, actively supported by Sir Whitworth Wallace, who was the first keeper of the Art Gallery.

It is a wonderful example of Southall's mastery of form. It is also a great record of the fashions of the time (Southall was a great lover of painting hats and the hats in this painting are by no means the most spectacular that he painted).

Southall was born in Nottingham to a Quaker family but, in 1862, after the death of his father, he went with his mother to live with his grandmother in Edgbaston. He was educated in York where he was taught drawing by Edwin Moore, who was a brother of the artist Albert Moore.

In September 1878, he was articled to Birmingham architects Martin and Chamberlain and in 1879 attended the Birmingham Municipal School of Art's Branch School in Osler Street in the evenings. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Brush with Genius; Sally Hoban Looks at the Work of One of Birmingham's Finest Painters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.