Probing the 'Controversial' Man at the DoE's Helm

Manila Bulletin, October 10, 2009 | Go to article overview

Probing the 'Controversial' Man at the DoE's Helm


He pleads “guilty” for not knowing much about the energy sector before taking the helm of the Department of Energy (DoE) – and history would prove that circumstances were oftentimes harsh to him as to the issues he had to deal with.More than two years on the job, and yet Energy secretary Angelo T. Reyes, self-effacingly admits that he is still on the “learning curve” as to understanding the issues and policies of the energy sector.“When I entered this department, it’s like being introduced into the woods, I knew nothing about energy and I don’t know anybody in the energy family,” he mused over. For such a challenging assignment, the key he said is having passion and willpower to steer the department into where it should be heading to.Make no mistake though, since as he articulated, it will not make one less of a leader “to accept your ignorance, to continue asking questions or to be willing to listen.” In any organization, he noted that there are always contrary viewpoints and opinions, and yet those are necessary to come up with balanced judgment at day’s end.He describes his leadership style as something that tends to both the needs of the organization and the call of the times – chiefly when referring to what are the necessary steps to be taken and achieved in the policy domain.Success in shepherding the ‘energy family’Although taking off from fairly nothing knowledge-wise, Secretary Reyes has seen the writing on the wall as to what are the necessary policy underpinnings that the DoE and the energy family (the common reference for the departments’s attached agencies) must aggressively push for.To a great extent, he leaned on the proficiency and competence of subalterns at the department and even with those at the attached agencies. Nevertheless, guiding them to action and policy paths were definitely the energy chief’s domain.“I think my best achievement here was I was able to mold a fighting team – a coherent, unified team of people…in other words, you have to be able to provide the environment so that it will bring out the best in people,” the energy secretary said.Call it stroke of luck, but after getting stalled for several years, the government’s privatization program for the power industry moved notches ahead during his watch. In just barely two years, the Power Sector Assets and Liabilities Management Corporation (PSALM) topped the targeted 70 percent threshold set for the divestment of the generation assets of the National Power Corporation, and the privatization of contracts with the independent power producers (IPPs) is now pulling ahead fairly well.The 25-year concession deal for the National Transmission Corporation (TransCo) was also finally awarded, after four failed biddings, to the consortium of State Grid of China, Monte Oro Grid Resources Corporation and Calaca High Power. Despite the headline-grabbing controversy that has shaken the process in 2007, the government successfully cornered the $3.95-billion concession contract for the country’s transmission backbone.Two major legislations – the Biofuels Act of 2006 and the Renewable Energy Act of 2008 – were also passed during Mr. Reyes’ time at the department.But before anyone would accuse him of unduly taking the credit, he has this to say: “I don’t want to get the credit for that because there are a lot of people who devoted their time on it…it just happened that the need for those legislations came at that time because of soaring oil prices.” It was in July 2008 that the ‘super spike’ in global oil prices was logged at $147 per barrel – considerably the second round of crisis following the oil shock of the 1970s.Appreciative of all the people who contributed sweat and knowledge equities in the formulation of such policies to underpin biofuels and renewable energy development, he noted that “what the country can gain and what it is proud about these was being among the first to come up with these laws. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Probing the 'Controversial' Man at the DoE's Helm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.