Neglect Figures Must Not Be Ignored; More Than One in 10 Professionals Working with Children in the North East Have Seen an Increase in Suspected Cases of Child Neglect in the Past Year, a National Welfare Charity Said. HELEN RAE Finds out What Is Being Done to Ensure Children Are Not Neglected

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), October 13, 2009 | Go to article overview

Neglect Figures Must Not Be Ignored; More Than One in 10 Professionals Working with Children in the North East Have Seen an Increase in Suspected Cases of Child Neglect in the Past Year, a National Welfare Charity Said. HELEN RAE Finds out What Is Being Done to Ensure Children Are Not Neglected


PROFESSIONALS in the North East are warning child neglect is on the increase in the region.

In the past year, more than one in 10 professionals working with children say they have seen a rise in suspected cases of child neglect, according to findings by the charity Action for Children.

The North East has the highest level of neglect cases in England as a percentage of children on council protection plans, figures show. There are 2,265 under-16s now under local authority watch, with 1,185 youngsters on the neglect register. The survey involved 70 front-line North East workers - including healthcare professionals and teachers - and another 1,900 across the country, of which 54% had encountered children receiving poor care in their homes, while 48% had been exposed to drug and alcohol abuse.

However, only 26% of the professionals surveyed said they had undergone training or received information on what to do if they suspect a child is being neglected.

Mick McCracken, head of safeguarding and children's social care at Newcastle City Council, said everything possible was being done to protect youngsters from neglect in the region. He said: "A lot of effort is regularly put into responding to child neglect cases and there is certainly a raised awareness of the issue.

"It is reassuring to see health professionals and schools are picking up on the issue and that is a possible explanation for the suspected rise in cases outlined in the survey.

"There is a robust system in place to deal with suspected child neglect cases and there is a comprehensive process professionals are guided through.

"Firstly, school staff or health visitors who notice a child and family is struggling, and feel they can deal with the issue themselves, would do something about it by offering practical advice and guidance to the family. However, if more worrying and complicated issues of child neglect arise then what we would do would be assess the family and draw in additional help.

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Neglect Figures Must Not Be Ignored; More Than One in 10 Professionals Working with Children in the North East Have Seen an Increase in Suspected Cases of Child Neglect in the Past Year, a National Welfare Charity Said. HELEN RAE Finds out What Is Being Done to Ensure Children Are Not Neglected
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