Political Science Professors Fight for Federal Grants; Senator Aims to Ax Funds

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 14, 2009 | Go to article overview

Political Science Professors Fight for Federal Grants; Senator Aims to Ax Funds


Byline: Stephen Dinan, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The nation's political scientists are on the warpath, angry at efforts to cut off their federal funding and at taunts that they are getting taxpayer dollars to do what television talking heads do already.

The professors of poli sci are fighting to save a taxpayer revenue stream amounting to $112 million in federal grants and other programs over the past decade to study topics ranging from how politicians benefit from being vague and how world leaders react to crises.

They're letting fly on budget hawk Sen. Tom Coburn's bid to eliminate the funds with the full force of academia: They blogged, they Tweeted, they filled Internet message boards, and they begged senators to save their National Science Foundation (NSF) funding.

Does Coburn have some special reason for hating NSF allocations to poli sci? Maybe his proposal for a dissertation improvement grant wasn't funded? wrote one anonymous commenter on PoliSciJobRumors.com, a Web site for political science folks, which erupted into a spirited debate as the Senate prepared to vote on the amendment.

Mr. Coburn, who is not backing down, offered the funding ban to a major spending bill being debated this week on the floor of the Senate.

And the Oklahoma Republican's office was not shy in its point-by-point rebuttal, with jokes about tweed jackets and the cushy life of the average college professor, and questions about whether ivory-tower political scientists aren't overmatched by the semiprofessionals on the cable and network talkfests.

The irony of this complaint is that real-world political science practitioners employed by media outlets - [George] Stephanopoulos, [Peggy] Noonan, James Carville, Karl Rove, Paul Begala, Larry Kudlow, Bill Bennett (the list goes on) - may know more about the subject than any of our premier political science faculties, Coburn spokesman John Hart said.

Among NSF's recent projects was one that sent $188,206 to the University of California at Berkeley to study candidate ambiguity and voter choice. According to the project abstract, the money would be used in part for polling to see when politicians benefit by being vague.

Another project sent $49,830 to the University of Iowa to look at genetics and political behavior. That grant pays for 20 professors to attend a workshop in Colorado, where they are trained on how to use applied statistical genetics to study political behavior.

The professors say their work is truly scientific and makes contributions to the country. Several pointed to examinations of how countries and leaders will act in times of crisis as an example of the value of their work. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Political Science Professors Fight for Federal Grants; Senator Aims to Ax Funds
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.