Radio Host Wins Pardon for Great-Uncles

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 15, 2009 | Go to article overview

Radio Host Wins Pardon for Great-Uncles


Byline: Valerie Richardson, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Syndicated radio-talk show host Tom Joyner's crusade to clear the names of two great-uncles executed in 1915 for the murder of a Confederate Army veteran ended triumphantly Wednesday when the South Carolina parole board pardoned both men.

The seven-member board voted unanimously to pardon Thomas and Meeks Griffin in what is thought to be the first posthumous pardon in a capital murder case in South Carolina history.

Mr. Joyner, whose radio show is broadcast on WMMJ-FM in Washington, D.C., and reaches an estimated 8 million listeners nationwide daily, said he was scared to death before speaking to the board but that something was going to be done.

Even though they're not here, this won't bring them back, but this will bring closure, Mr. Joyner said in televised remarks after the decision. I hope now they rest in peace.

Mr. Joyner was accompanied at the hearing by Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr., who inadvertently launched the quest when he traced Mr. Joyner's genealogy two years ago for a PBS documentary, African-American Lives II.

Mr. Joyner, working with Mr. Gates and Albany Law School professor Paul Finkelman, petitioned the governor and parole board for a hearing last year. They presented evidence showing that the Griffin brothers failed to get a fair trial and were convicted despite evidence that others may have committed the crime.

The Griffin brothers were accused in the 1913 murder of John Q. Lewis, a 73-year-old Confederate veteran, at his home in Blackstock, S.C. A judge refused to postpone their trial even though it was scheduled just two days after their indictment, and just one day after their attorney was given access to the coroner's inquest.

Four days later, on July 12, 1913, the brothers and two other defendants were convicted of the murder. They were sentenced to die in the electric chair.

According to Mr. …

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Radio Host Wins Pardon for Great-Uncles
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