Roanoke's Eminent-Domain Shame; Government Land Grab Undermines Private Property

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 18, 2009 | Go to article overview

Roanoke's Eminent-Domain Shame; Government Land Grab Undermines Private Property


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

If only we could abolish corporate greed and replace it with caring government programs and public-spirited non-profit service providers, our health care problems will be solved. That's the plan anyway, but those who are depending on it might need to remember one thing: Corporations aren't greedy. People are. And unfortunately people are a necessary ingredient in all the intricate plans being hatched in Congress and shaped by the White House.

Western Virginia's Roanoke provides a perfect example of how health care, non-profits and government can run amok in ways that feature all the ills Democrats blame on corporations.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Roanoke's nonprofit Carilion Clinic launched mergers to increase market share, gave a multimillion lump sum retirement package to one executive and million dollar salaries to others just like a for-profit company, only Carilion's activities benefited from a nice tax exemption worth around $50 million a year. Carilion's clout grew just like a big business as it became a top regional employer and expanded dozens of subsidiaries as far from nonprofit health care as a venture capital group.

And that expansion brought in the government. With a billion dollars in assets, Carilion is just the kind of powerful corporate citizen to which local governments often cater. So when Carilion decided it wanted to expand into an area surrounded by other businesses, the city was willing to do almost anything to help them do it. Launched in secret meetings code named Andy's Warehouse, the city put in motion plans to hijack the land using the power of eminent domain.

With the scheme in place, an independent consultant conveniently declared the land blighted so that the city housing and redevelopment authority could start stripping property from more than two dozen of its rightful owners.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Roanoke's Eminent-Domain Shame; Government Land Grab Undermines Private Property
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.