Manila Vows to Push for Human Rights

Manila Bulletin, October 23, 2009 | Go to article overview

Manila Vows to Push for Human Rights


HUA HIN, Thailand – The Philippines vowed Friday to play an active role in the newly-established ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights which seeks to develop cooperation to promote and protect human rights in a region where governments are facing charges of rights abuses.Foreign Affairs Secretary Alberto Romulo represented President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo during the inauguration ceremonies for the new body here.Leaders of the nine other Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member countries were present to formally launch the AICHR which embodies the member governments’ intention to improve their respective records of human rights protection.Earlier, President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo appointed Ambassador Rosario Manalo as the country’s representative to the AICHR.The Department of Foreign Affairs said the Chief Executive made Manalo’s appointment as the Southeast Asian leaders launched the Philippines-initiated AICHR, the first regional human rights body in the Asia-Pacific, at the 15th ASEAN Summit in Hua Hin.“To represent the Philippines in the AICHR, President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo has appointed Ambassador Rosario G. Manalo,” the DFA said in a statement.Civil society and international human rights bodies, meanwhile, have aired skepticism over how far the AICHR would go to protect citizens against present and future abuses by various government regimes.To be funded with a $200,000 startup fund in its first year of operation, the fledgling AICHR already faces charges of being a toothless tiger in the face of allegations of high incidence of human rights abuses in certain ASEAN member countries, particularly in the military-run state of Myanmar.Romulo earlier said the Myanmar government should fulfill its "long overdue" commitments as part of the ASEAN family since 1997.Manalo, for her part, assailed critics of the new human rights body, saying that consideration of proposals for the imposition of sanctions against erring member governments and country visits may have to wait.“Why are you so hung up on giving teeth to an organization that is just in its infancy? When the AICHR is ready then let’s give it teeth,” Manalo said.The Philippine official said that the AICHR cannot be compared yet to a similar body of the United Nations, pointing out that the UN was able to create it after 64 years of existence.“The problem with NGOs (nongovernment organizations) is they want the sauce for the gander to be sauce for the goose as well,” Manalo stated.“Civil society cannot dictate upon governments on how to do these things. Sorry na lang kasi governments are also not happy with what they do. We are talking of 10 countries here, different systems. It doesn’t follow that the black monkey has to follow what the white monkey did,” she added.Nevertheless, the AICHR representative said the body will have to face these constraints in carrying out its mandate.“The constraints, challenges, barriers as much as you want the ideal, you can only approximate it because of these constraints I think some of these civil society groups understand this, or if they understand it they still choose to ignore these realities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Manila Vows to Push for Human Rights
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.