World Pasta Day 2009: Pasta Meals on Every Family Table

Manila Bulletin, October 24, 2009 | Go to article overview

World Pasta Day 2009: Pasta Meals on Every Family Table


Today is World Pasta Day. The National Pasta Association and the International Pasta Organization (IPO) will host a conference of the world’s leading pasta manufacturers in New York, United States, to present the latest nutritional and scientific research on pasta to the industry at large.Begun in 1995, World Pasta Day has become an international celebration. This year’s focus is “Pasta Meals on Every Family Table.” Enriched pasta has a special niche in the refined grain category. Its unique chemical structure places the pasta among the lowest-ranked carbohydrates on the Glycemic Index (GI), a tool used by health professionals to measure the speed at which food raises a person’s blood sugar.Experts assert that “slow-release carbohydrates” that are found in low-GI foods such as pasta, “may play a key role in preventing chronic diseases like diabetes and coronary heart ailments.” With pasta combined with other healthy ingredients such as fiber-rich vegetables and beans or protein-packed lean meat, poultry, or fish, the digestion process is slowed down, making one feel fuller longer. Pasta is a generic term for foods made from unleavened dough of flour and water, and sometimes a combination of egg and flour. …

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World Pasta Day 2009: Pasta Meals on Every Family Table
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