Abstracts of Japanese Essays on Evelyn Waugh, 1955-1961

By Usui, Yoshiharu | Evelyn Waugh Newsletter and Studies, Autumn 2009 | Go to article overview

Abstracts of Japanese Essays on Evelyn Waugh, 1955-1961


Usui, Yoshiharu, Evelyn Waugh Newsletter and Studies


Uramatsu, Samitaro. "Shinku, Keiren, Gyouketsu: Evelyn Waugh, 'Officers and Gentlemen,' 1955 [Vacuum, convulsion, and coagulation: Evelyn Waugh, Officers and Gentlemen (1955)]." Gakuto [Learning stirrups] (Tokyo) 52.12 (1955): 22-24.

Abstract: Evelyn Waugh's latest novel, Officers and Gentlemen, is a masterpiece. This novel is a sequel to Men at Arms but an independent work. In this novel Waugh depicts not stories of war but comedy of war. This time Waugh does not take up Catholicism. His style is not difficult but crisp and clear. He does not describe the inside of the characters or the scenery. In these ways, Officers and Gentlemen is quite different from Brideshead Revisited. This novel is constructed as a series of episodes. In this sense it is like a one-act play. The three words of this article's title, vacuum, convulsion, and coagulation, come from the text. Waugh uses these three words to explain the structure of the army, its true nature and human relationships. This novel indicates the maturity of Evelyn Waugh as a satirical novelist.

Kuroda, Keiyu. "Shohyo, Evelyn Waugh: Officers and Gentlemen [Review of Evelyn Waugh's Officers and Gentlemen]." Hiroshima Daigaku Eigo Eibungaku Kiyo [Hiroshima Studies in English Language and Literature, English Literary Association of Hiroshima University] 3.1 (1956): 93-94.

Abstract: Evelyn Waugh's Officers and Gentlemen is, like Men at Arms, a war novel based on his experience in the army during World War II. Waugh intended to write a trilogy. However, Waugh said he had completed his intention with the two volumes. He does not seem likely to write the third for the time being. Officers and Gentlemen is more pessimistic than Men at Arms. The pessimism is a criticism of war. The author eyes the weakness of men in war, rather than war itself. Though the satire and jests in this novel are not better than those in Men at Arms, they are still brilliant. The veil of illusion is tragically stripped off. Though the third volume is not written, the pilgrimage of Guy Crouchback should not be ended here.

Kuroda, Keiyu. "E. Waugh no Brideshead Revisited ni tsuite-Bungaku to Shukyo [On Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisted: Literature and Religion]." Hiroshima Daigaku Eigo Eibungaku Kiyo [Hiroshima Studies in English Language and Literature, English Literary Association of Hiroshima University] 4.1 (1957): 26-36.

Abstract: Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited depicts his own rediscovery of religious belief after his conversion to Catholicism. However, if Waugh had written about the torment of tragic figures, Sebastian and Lady Marchmain, the novel would have been more meaningful to the present age. Catholicism is one of Waugh's basic inspirations. It bore magnificent fruit in The Loved One. Then, through religious belief, Waugh wrote the satirical novels Men at Arms and Officers and Gentlemen. Because these two works describe the pilgrimage of the protagonist, Guy Crouchback, they seem truthful to the reader. Brideshead Revisited is a laborious work that depicts the beauty of ruin, the loss of youth in Oxford, the protagonist's passion, and the downfall of traditional culture at a grand country house.

Funatsu, Shigeteru. "Waugh no A Handful of Dust ni tsuite [On A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh]." Toyo Daigaku Kiyo [Journal of Toyo University] 12 (1958): 85-93.

Abstract: Evelyn Waugh probably based A Handful of Dust on Voltaire's Candide. Waugh's 'city' is the wasteland that T. S. Eliot depicted. Eldorado in Candide is the utopia that people in the eighteenth century desired. In Eldorado, there are no wars, crimes, or laws. Science is respected and people are equal. They have simple religious faith. Property and wealth are evenly distributed. Inhabitants despise gold and wealth. They laugh at material desire and European taste. People in the 1930s had to live in a suffocating society. They feared war and faithlessness. It was the age of agitation.

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