How Does ACEI Help Children and Teachers?

Childhood Education, Fall 2009 | Go to article overview

How Does ACEI Help Children and Teachers?


ACEI conducts effective public advocacy to ensure that ACEI's positions are represented in a wide variety of public forums and among major coalitions for children and education. The Association works closely with other organizations to promote the rights of children and teachers.

UNITED NATIONS, ECOSOC, AND THE UN DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INFORMATION (DPI)

ACEI is a nongovernmental organization (NGO) member of the United Nations, affiliated with the NGO Committee on UNICEF, Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), and the UN Department of Public Information (DPI). ACEI's interests are represented by two child advocates, Nancy Brown and Judit Szente, who are members of two working groups: the Working Group on Education and the Working Group on Violence Against Children. Additionally, they attend the annual conference on the Committee on Teaching About the United Nations (CTAUN), the annual conference for NGOs sponsored by the DPI, and other related UN events.

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR ACCREDITATION OF TEACHER EDUCATION (NCATE)

NCATE accredits schools, colleges, and departments of education in the United States that meet rigorous national standards in preparing teachers for the classroom. ACEI is a constituent member and currently holds seats on the Board of Directors and Board of Examiners. Fifty-nine ACEI members serve as volunteer Program Reviewers of institutions with elementary programs to ensure that they consistently meet ACEI/NCATE Standards. …

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How Does ACEI Help Children and Teachers?
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