How We Can Learn from Tiger; Performance Measurement Should Be a Fact of Life for Business but, as Milica Kitson, Chief Executive of Constructing Excellence inWales, Explains, to Cut Carbon Emissions and Reduce wasteWelsh Construction Has to Keep a Close Eye on Its Scorecard:

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), November 4, 2009 | Go to article overview

How We Can Learn from Tiger; Performance Measurement Should Be a Fact of Life for Business but, as Milica Kitson, Chief Executive of Constructing Excellence inWales, Explains, to Cut Carbon Emissions and Reduce wasteWelsh Construction Has to Keep a Close Eye on Its Scorecard:


Byline: Milica Kitson

REPORTS about medium-sized construction firms being removed from local authorities' lists of preferred contractors because they cannot provide any key performance indicator data have been common recently.

It is frustrating for these companies - they have been acceptable for years, but now they aren't and they feel aggrieved. That's understandable, but whether we like it or not, performance measurement is here to stay.

We can approach the issue in one of two ways: we can use performance measurement as a tool for improvement, or we can tick a few boxes, fill in a few data forms, and get no benefit at all. With Welsh construction facing tough Welsh Assembly Government targets to recycle more than 85% of construction and demolition waste by 2010; to make sure all new homes built by 2011 are zero carbon rated and work towards reducing all CO2 emissions by 80% by 2050, adopting performance measurement is vital. Why? Well, we need to know how we are doing. We can measure how effective the actual construction process is with simple targets based on budgets, timing and safety. But we can also test how efficient the building is and the manner in which it is built.

Planning a project at the outset will help design out wasteful practices on site and make it easier to install energy efficient systems and products in the scheme itself. This team approach, married to a system of measurement, is the only way we stand a chance of meeting these tough sustainability targets. The case for measurement is made more strongly if we look outside our own industry. …

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How We Can Learn from Tiger; Performance Measurement Should Be a Fact of Life for Business but, as Milica Kitson, Chief Executive of Constructing Excellence inWales, Explains, to Cut Carbon Emissions and Reduce wasteWelsh Construction Has to Keep a Close Eye on Its Scorecard:
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