Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives Addressing Social Exclusion in Bangladesh

By Werner, Wendy J. | Journal of Health Population and Nutrition, August 2009 | Go to article overview

Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives Addressing Social Exclusion in Bangladesh


Werner, Wendy J., Journal of Health Population and Nutrition


INTRODUCTION

Improving the health and welfare of socially-excluded populations depends on enabling socially-excluded populations to meet their health, nutrition, and educational needs. Social change through, for instance, economic empowerment and reduced inequality has been critical in enabling socially-excluded populations to meet their basic human needs. In some cases, human needs can be met through various public-sector and non-governmental organizations (NGO) programmes. However, the ability of the public sector to fulfill the long-term requirements of this population segment can be limited. To achieve sustainable improvements in the health and welfare of socially-excluded populations, sustainable solutions must be found that provide the populations themselves with resources and integrate these structural changes into societal institutions. As the private sector is an important and growing force in least-developed countries, the analysis considers the potential for private-sector initiatives and partnerships--collectively labelled corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives--to impact social status, earning potential, and access to services and resources for socially-excluded populations.

CSR is an increasingly important tool to maximize the positive development impact of corporations and commercial activity in the developing world. In Bangladesh, companies, civil society organizations (CSOs)/NGOs, and development partners have adapted international practices of CSR to the local context and are working in partnership to improve employment opportunities and healthcare for excluded groups.

Interesting and significant questions remain about CSR initiatives, particularly in developing countries. The analysis presents some of these issues in the context of Bangladesh, which exhibits parallels with other resource-constrained developing countries. In an environment of weak enforcement of regulations, is compliance with local labour and health standards treated as CSR? Is it appropriate for a commercial entity to help provide basic community services and infrastructure? Does reliance on corporations make socially-excluded populations more vulnerable in the case of economic difficulties or shifting corporate priorities? How can NGOs, civil society, and the Government work with corporations without compromising their unique purpose and mission? The analysis of CSR case studies attempts to provide some insights into these critical questions and makes recommendations for how to design a strategy to engage the private sector in addressing the needs of socially-excluded populations while avoiding potential pitfalls.

CSR activities in Bangladesh provide specific examples of CSR implemented in developing countries from which one can draw critical lessons and recommendations for international efforts to harness the power of the private sector to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and improve the health and welfare of socially-excluded populations. The CSR examples included in this analysis were selected purposively to represent different strategies of the CSR--both pure private sector and partnerships of the private sector and NGOs. The paper draws from available published and grey literature and fact-checking with stakeholders.

CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND DEVELOPMENT

CSR is an evolving concept globally but, in Bangladesh, it has been defined as a set of business practices based on ethical norms and transparency that contributes to the sustainable development of internal and external stakeholders in the best interest of business society and environment [Bangladesh Enterprise Institute. Script for CSR documentary feature (corporate). 2006 (Unpublished)]. A socially-responsible firm holds a holistic view of itself in relation to its stakeholders and measures its performance via a triple bottom-line: economic/ financial, environmental, and social. CSR seeks a path which advances all the three measures, none at the cost of the others. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives Addressing Social Exclusion in Bangladesh
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.