Digging the Past Online

By Holzberg, Carol S. | Technology & Learning, September 1998 | Go to article overview

Digging the Past Online


Holzberg, Carol S., Technology & Learning


By studying the remains of previous cultures and placing these objects in historical context, archeologists provide a wealth of information about past societies. Thanks to the Internet, students can join in on virtual digs, while learning about archeological excavation, classification, dating and interpretation at sites all over the world.

* Archeological Resources for Education (www.inter log.com/~jabram/elise/archres.htm)--A general introduction to archeology and archeological offerings on the Net with links to virtual excavations at several sites including New York City's Lower East Side Tenement Museum (an "urban log cabin" tenement apartment dating from the 1870s-1930s); Old Sturbridge Village (a New England farming community of the 1830s); and Plimoth Plantation (a 17th century New England Colonial village). The site features a wealth of teacher resources, including a glossary of archeological terms.

* Excavations at Caesarea Maritima, Israel (www.in form.umd.edu/Caesareal)--learn more about Caesarea, the ancient metropolis and seaport built by King Herod between 22 and 10 B.C.E. to honor the Roman emperor Caesar Augustus. Amphibious and terrestrial excavations have uncovered city streets, private dwellings, aqueducts, and baths, in addition to a circus, stadium, and theater.

* Horace's Villa Project, Licenza, Italy (www.hum net.ucla.edu/horaces-villa/)--A leading lyric and satiric poet of the Golden Age of Roman literature, Quintus Horatius Flaccus ("Horace" in English) lived from 65 to 8 B. …

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