Media Credibility Raised by British News Council

By Hyde, Joy | St. Louis Journalism Review, September 1998 | Go to article overview

Media Credibility Raised by British News Council


Hyde, Joy, St. Louis Journalism Review


The purpose of a news council is to provide the public an avenue to file complaints about news outlets. The United States has never had a national news council similar to the Public Complaints Commission (PCC) in Great Britain. The only formal news council in the U.S. is a regional council serving only the state of Minnesota.

Bob Shaw, founding member of the Minnesota News Council, says that news councils are good for the news media but the media does not particularly like the councils.

"The working media at best tolerates a council ... The public, though, loves the idea of a council, and the public needs it," Shaw says. "We have noticed that when members of the public go through our process, their respect for the news media is higher."

The same is true of English subjects. The PCC in London is designed to protect individuals from defamation of character and intrusion into their private lives by certain sections of the press. Founded in 1991, the PCC represents national and regional editors of the British news media. Together, they produced a Code of Practice.

For the first time, Parliament believed "non-statutory self-regulation can be made to work effectively. This is a stiff test for the press. If it fails, we recommend that a statutory system for handling complaints should be introduced."

The PCC had 18 months to prove that self-regulation would work. Otherwise, Parliament would consider formal legislation to regulate the intrusion of privacy. Legislation dealing with defamation and libel already exist in British law.

Intense scrutiny from Parliament, the government and the public has prompted press self-regulation to become stronger.

"Our aim at the Press Complaints Commission remains consistent: to uphold the freedom of the press - which is absolutely fundamental to a healthy democracy - at the same time as providing an increasingly effective and accountable method of redress for abuses of that freedom," Rt. Hon Lord Wakeham, chairman of the PCC, says.

Since the appointment of Lord Wakeham in 1995, the PCC has increased its commitment to the effectiveness and endurance of the PCC. As a result, the government acknowledged the PCC's continuing efforts to self-regulate and reaffirmed its support of the PCC.

Most complaints made with the PCC are resolved to the satisfaction of those complaining. When a complaint is filed, several requirements must be met by the "victim. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Media Credibility Raised by British News Council
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.