Palin, Oprah & Media Literacy

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 18, 2009 | Go to article overview

Palin, Oprah & Media Literacy


Byline: Marybeth Hicks, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Thanks to Oprah Winfrey's interview of former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, I'm heading out to buy her book, Going Rogue: An American Life.

Like millions of Americans, Mrs. Palin intrigues me, not because I'm a huge fan or a huge skeptic, but because despite mountains of media content produced about her, she remains a mystery.

Those who want the stereotyped, Saturday Night Live image of Mrs. Palin to hold up as fact argue that the mainstream media has offered an accurate picture of the woman and that picture is I can see Russia from my house.

Newsweek this week affirmed this absurd image by using on its cover a photograph from a Runner's World profile of Mrs. Palin. In such a context, the magazine intentionally sought to affirm David Letterman's crude slutty flight attendant comment.

The obvious conclusion based on these media portrayals is that Mrs. Palin is too uninformed and unintelligent for national leadership. Unfortunately for Palin haters, such a conclusion simply flies in the face of the principles of media literacy.

Media literacy is the ability to assess and evaluate media content and understand its underlying messages in the full awareness that someone owns it, produced it and is using it to promote a particular point of view.

This idea isn't very complicated. In fact, the Center for Media Literacy (CML) has long advocated that parents teach their children the five basic principles that must be applied when evaluating media content: Media messages are constructed; they contain embedded values and points of view; they use staging to make a metaphorical point; they are interpreted based on a person's life experience; and they're driven by profit and political motives.

For years, I've followed CML's advice and taught my children these principles in order to help them understand why certain toys don't perform as advertised, why a pair of basketball shoes named for an NBA star won't improve your game, and why we don't permit them to watch certain TV shows that undermine our values. …

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