Newt Gingrich: The Establishment's Conservative: Self-Proclaimed Conservative Newt Gingrich Could Be the Next Republican Candidate for President. but with His Unconstitutional Track Record, Will He Be "Right" for America?

By Terrell, Rebecca | The New American, December 7, 2009 | Go to article overview

Newt Gingrich: The Establishment's Conservative: Self-Proclaimed Conservative Newt Gingrich Could Be the Next Republican Candidate for President. but with His Unconstitutional Track Record, Will He Be "Right" for America?


Terrell, Rebecca, The New American


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Just as report cards keep parents posted on their children's progress in school, constituents have a tool to let them know how their federal representatives measure up to their oaths to uphold the Constitution. We should expect high "grades" from them, because it is not difficult to determine whether legislation oversteps the clearly delineated, limited powers of the Constitution. If there is uncertainty, the Bill of Rights tells the government everything else is off limits. Moreover, an oath calls God as witness to the oath-taker's honesty and integrity. In other words, it is both illegal and immoral to violate the Constitution. Why are so many Representatives bringing home Fs on their report cards? They may mean well, but a Congressman's good intentions do not fulfill his obligation before God to vote according to the law. You will find the Freedom Index on page 22.

So the burden is, as it should be, on "We the People," and we have no one to blame but ourselves if we continue to send failing Representatives to Washington. We must use the Constitution as a litmus test. This will be especially important in 2012 since Obama seems to have a callous disregard for the Constitution and his oath to uphold it. As a Senator in the 110th Congress, his cumulative Freedom Index score was 11. But what alternatives will we have?

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There are a growing number of candidates for Congress who are running in support of the Constitution. Many of them were motivated to become involved as a result of the political phenomenon in the last presidential race that became known as the "Ron Paul Revolution." But if the GOP establishment has its way, the Republicans who will go to Washington will be of the neocon variety and will offer voters looking for alternatives to the liberal Democrats more of an echo than a choice. The establishment-favored Newt Gingrich is a case in point.

The Republican Answer?

After more than a decade out of the spotlight, Newt Gingrich is once again making headlines as a conservative author and basking in media speculation of his possibility as a presidential candidate. He is busy promoting his conservatively themed books and documentaries while touting firm belief in limited government and personal freedoms. Gingrich's rhetoric brings back memories of his old days as a staunch proponent of cutting taxes, balancing the budget, reducing bureaucratic regulations, and strengthening national defense.

Just as in those days, Newt Gingrich now positions himself as a conservative. But does his definition of conservative mean loyalty to the Constitution, or loyalty to the establishment? "Understanding the real Newt Gingrich ... is essential," said John F. McManus, president of the John Birch Society and producer of the new DVD The Real Newt Gingrich. "Americans must realize that they are being persuaded to follow false leaders, to put confidence in men who don't deserve our confidence." Both Gingrich's congressional track record and his present activities prove him no better than the current White House occupant.

Gingrich Resume

Newt Gingrich served in Congress from 1979 until 1999. His first Freedom Index score (when it was known as the "Conservative Index") was 84, but it nose-dived from there. He achieved his lowest scores as Speaker of the House. Gingrich consistently lost points for his propensity to support unconstitutional legislation.

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1. Education--Gingrich backed federal education funding from his earliest days in office, though the Constitution gives absolutely no authority over education to any branch of the federal government. He helped garner support to create President Jimmy Carter's Department of Education in 1979. Since then educational spending has soared while educational standards have plummeted. Things got worse when he was Speaker. In 1996, then-Republican Party Chairman Haley Barbour bragged that "education spending went up under the Republican Congress as much as it went up under the Democratic Congress. …

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