Forced Grooming Found to Constitute Patient Abuse and to Be Grounds for Removal of Psychiatric Nurse from Her Position

By Hafemeister, Thomas L. | Developments in Mental Health Law, January 2007 | Go to article overview

Forced Grooming Found to Constitute Patient Abuse and to Be Grounds for Removal of Psychiatric Nurse from Her Position


Hafemeister, Thomas L., Developments in Mental Health Law


The level of grooming and personal hygiene can be a source of ongoing tension and conflict between residents and staff in a facility for individuals with a mental disorder. A failure to attend to grooming and hygiene may antagonize staff and other residents, and taken to extremes can pose a health risk. At the same time, principles of autonomy and privacy encourage respect for a person's right to make these decisions for themselves, a right that is now widely acknowledged to be generally retained by individuals even when their placement in the facility is the result of court-ordered civil commitment.

A federal court of appeals ruled that a staff member who engages in forceful behavior to impose grooming on a resident without adequate justification may be found to have engaged in patient abuse and can lose his or her position as a result.

A licensed practical nurse had worked as a psychiatric nurse at a Veterans Administration hospital for seventeen years with no prior record of discipline. One evening while making rounds dispensing medication to patients, the psychiatric nurse told a patient who had been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia that he needed a haircut and she was going to cut his hair. The patient responded that he did not want a haircut. The nurse nonetheless proceeded to cut his hair.

The nurse then began to shave the patient's beard. The patient again objected and attempted to "roll off' in his wheelchair. The patient's hand and the wheel of his wheelchair were held to prevent him from leaving. The patient became more agitated, physically resisting and cursing. The patient's wrists were held, at which point the patient continued to repeat his objections and started kicking. At this point the nurse ceased her efforts to shave the patient's beard. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Forced Grooming Found to Constitute Patient Abuse and to Be Grounds for Removal of Psychiatric Nurse from Her Position
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.