Sisters Raise Money for Diabetes Research

The Florida Times Union, December 12, 2009 | Go to article overview

Sisters Raise Money for Diabetes Research


Four Clay County girls diagnosed with diabetes will participate this weekend in Northeast Florida fundraisers for research into the disease, with two of the girls to be honored at a 5K walk and the other two in a production of "Fiddler on the Roof."

Today Oakleaf Town Center will host the first Winter Walk to benefit Kaylin's Kure and Trin's Troopers, a team of Middleburg sisters raising money for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

The teams are named after Kaylin Hoffman, 9, and her sister Trinity Hoffmann, 6, both of whom have type 1 diabetes, although their family has no history of the disease, according to a news release.

Proceeds from the Winter Walk will help fund "research needed for the best control of type 1 diabetes and ultimately, a cure," according to the release.

The Hoffmans have raised more than $25,000 in recent years through participation in the Walk to Cure Diabetes, which takes place every spring in Jacksonville.

Meanwhile, Lillian Dinkins, 11, and her sister Caroline Dinkins, 9, of Orange Park, who also have type 1 diabetes, were selected for special roles in a production of "Fiddler on the Roof" at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Art's Terry Theatre in Jacksonville through Sunday, according to a news release.

The Dinkins sisters trained over the past few months to perfect their roles.

Hosted by the American International Music Management company, the event also will benefit the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. …

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