'Ms. Lisabeth' Shares History

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 17, 2009 | Go to article overview

'Ms. Lisabeth' Shares History


Byline: Joyce Sanchez, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Born, raised and still living in the same house - the oldest in what longtime Alexandrians know as the Seminary community - Elizabeth Henry Douglas is a rare gem with lots to tell, and she remembers it all very well.

Ms. Lisabeth, as we called her as youngsters and still do today, can always come up with something to brighten your day - a story to share, an old photograph or a newspaper clipping. There is nothing like a picture to help tell a story, and she comes up with them out of the blue.

I always loved to take pictures, Mrs. Douglas says.

She is a true Seminarian and historian in her own right.

The Alexandria Archaeological Commission, under the auspices of the Office of Historic Alexandria, awarded Mrs. Douglas the Bernard Brenman Archaeology in Alexandria Award. The honor was presented by Mayor William D. Euille during a City Council meeting on Oct. 27. Other recipients included founding commission member Vivienne Mitchell; historic property owner Joe Reeder; Sara Borgatti, for a children's Revolutionary War project; and the Louis Berger Group, for its historic study and archaeological investigation of the Bruin Slave Jail site on Duke Street.

The award is named for retired Army Col. Brenman, a city activist who was a founding member of the commission and served as its chairman for 21 years.

Mrs. Douglas received the award as a knowledgeable source and generous donor of West End history, particularly through her contributions to oral history. Further, her recognition reads: She witnessed the transformation of the once rural community near the [Virginia Theological] Seminary and Oakland Baptist Church. She has shared her stories, recollections, and knowledge of members of the African American community who can trace their family history to the Civil War period. Her contributions are the basis of the 'African American Walking Tour' at Fort Ward and help researchers identify other potential archaeological sites at the Fort.

Many of her family, church and community members attended the awards ceremony.

The song Precious Memories how they linger ) is a great testimony for an outstanding historian. When you start a conversation with Ms. Lisabeth regarding her neighborhood, she begins by telling you that former accounts about the community's development got it all wrong.

Mudtown was not where they said it was. That was called Macedonia, she says of former names given the neighborhood throughout the late 19th century and 20th century by others, including city developers.

Yes, her memory and historical knowledge are still sharp for a spry woman in her 90s. She loves to share what she knows. All she needs is a listening ear.

The old Alexandrians knew about the people who lived in Seminary, where I also live. We were called the people from the sticks, but we were well-respected. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Ms. Lisabeth' Shares History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.