A Snapshot of States' Teacher Education and Training Programs

By Kiker, Jason; Emeagwali, N. Susan | Techniques, January 2010 | Go to article overview

A Snapshot of States' Teacher Education and Training Programs


Kiker, Jason, Emeagwali, N. Susan, Techniques


States are doing much to bolster teacher education, training and professional development in recognition that challenges exist in the sustenance of a pipeline of qualified educators in all areas, including career and technical education (CTE). A recent brief, "Teacher Shortage Undermines CTE," by the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium noted that the key factors contributing to the teacher shortage in CTE are an increase in demand for more classes; the elimination of teacher education programs; and the growing number of retirements.

The demand for CTE classes has been on the upswing, according to figures from the Office of Vocational and Adult Education, with more than 15 million students enrolled in CTE courses at the high school and postsecondary levels during the 2006-2007 program year--an increase of almost 6 million students in just seven years.

While the demand for CTE courses has been on the increase, there are fewer teachers to teach them. One contributing factor is the reduction of teacher preparation programs. The National Research Center for Career and Technical Education reported that from 1990 to 2000, the number of CTE teacher education programs fell from 432 to 385 programs, a decrease of 11 percent.

Also adding to the teacher shortage is the growing number of teacher retirements. In 2009, the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future estimated that "during the next four years we could lose a third of our most accomplished educators to retirement."

As states work to address these shortages, they are employing a number of strategies to attract and keep educators in the classroom. The following snapshots are a sampling of what some states are doing to improve and enhance teacher education and training. The information is taken from the state profiles developed by the Association for Career and Technical Education.

State profiles have been thoroughly researched and contain information on a range of issues, including state administration, CTE initiatives and related policies, and local program examples. This information was gained from interviews with state leaders, states' Perkins IV implementation plans, and various federal, state and local agency Web sites. State CTE leaders have reviewed the information to ensure accuracy and the most recent information.

Teacher Education, Training and Professional Development

Idaho

The state has several professional development activities for professional-technical education (PTE) teachers and administrators. The Leadership Institute prepares the next generation of district and state PTE leaders. It is designed to produce forward-thinking and change-oriented leaders through a 27-month program of study and consists of four basic components: 13 seminars on Idaho and national PTE policies, processes and leadership; the development of an administrative professional development plan; attainment of an Idaho PTE administrator's certificate; and an optional third year of administrative mentoring/ internship.

Kentucky

The Kentucky Teacher Internship Program (KTIP) provides an intensive, yearlong internship for all beginning teachers seeking a teaching certificate. The internship is served under the guidance and tutelage of a beginning teacher committee, whose members are experienced educators who have completed specialized training in KTIR Their KTIP training emphasizes increased academic knowledge and understanding of areas of instruction, along with an assessment on the performance of the beginning teacher. The specialized training for the educators serving on the teacher committees is done through contractual agreements with teacher training institutions (which are mostly postsecondary institution supported).

Missouri

In 2003, Missouri created the Career Education Statewide Mentoring Program for New and Returning Teachers and Counselors to help retain quality CTE teachers.

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