Classroom Use of the Art Print: Nefertari Playing Senet, Detail of a Wall Painting from the Tomb of Queen Nefertari, New Kingdom (Fresco). Egyptian; 19th Dynasty, C. 1297-1185 B.C. Valley of the Queens, Thebes, Egypt

Arts & Activities, January 2010 | Go to article overview

Classroom Use of the Art Print: Nefertari Playing Senet, Detail of a Wall Painting from the Tomb of Queen Nefertari, New Kingdom (Fresco). Egyptian; 19th Dynasty, C. 1297-1185 B.C. Valley of the Queens, Thebes, Egypt


THINGS TO KNOW Queen Nefertari was the chief wife of the pharaoh, Ramses II. In 1914, Egyptologists discovered her tomb in the Valley of the Queens, an area of desert located on the west bank of the Nile near Luxor, Thebes to the ancient Egyptians. In addition to Nefertari's tomb (tomb #66), there are up to 80 tombs of other queens, royal offspring and noblemen.

Smaller and less elaborate than the tombs found in the Valley of the Kings, Nefertari's tomb is noted for the extensive series of wall paintings, which depict her beauty and religious devotion. Directly to the right of this month's Clip & Save selection, Nefertari Playing Senet, is a depiction of the queen as a ba bird. To the Egyptians, the ba was the spiritual equivalent of the mortal being, and could travel freely between the worlds of the living and the afterlife.

All of the scenes found on the walls of Nefertari's tomb were meant to guide the queen's spirit through the afterlife. These paintings were often found on the walls of corridors leading to small anterooms. Painted in vivid colors and complemented by extensive hieroglyphic symbols, all of the images were believed to aid in the queen's quest for immortality. The paintings are remarkable for the enormous detail paid to things such as the queen's clothing and jewelry, and to the realistic depiction of her facial features.

Nefertari is playing a game called senet, which was an ancient precursor to backgammon. Senet boards were common funerary objects placed in ancient Egyptian tombs. To see an example of a senet board found in the tomb of King Tutankhamen, go to: www.touregypt.net/MUSEUM/tutl69.htm.

In 1986, the Egyptian Antiquities Organization and the Getty Conservation Institute began a six-year restoration project of the wall paintings in the tomb of Queen Nefertari. Adding nothing to the original frescoes, the conservators methodically cleaned every square inch of the 5,200 square feet of paintings before reattaching bits of fallen plaster. Areas where the remnants of plaster had disintegrated were left blank. The tomb was opened to visitors in 1995, and today only 150 tourists are allowed in the tombs daily, to protect the fragile paintings from dust and humidity: a byproduct of human breath.

THINGS TO DO

* Primary. To introduce the subject of Ancient Egypt and to activate prior knowledge and build background knowledge, read aloud Tutankhamen's Gift, by Robert Sabuda (Atheneum, 1994). This story, with its boldly drawn and vividly colored illustrations, will inspire students to learn more about ancient Egypt, and will allow them to make connections to the Art Print, Nefertari Playing Senet.

Share the Art Print and ask students to describe what is happening in the image. Explain that the woman in the picture was a famous queen of Ancient Egypt, a powerful civilization that flourished over 3,000 years ago, and she is playing a game popular in her day.

Next, explain to students the painting makes up only one of a series of wall paintings adorning her tomb.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Classroom Use of the Art Print: Nefertari Playing Senet, Detail of a Wall Painting from the Tomb of Queen Nefertari, New Kingdom (Fresco). Egyptian; 19th Dynasty, C. 1297-1185 B.C. Valley of the Queens, Thebes, Egypt
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.