Could Video Games in the Classroom Help Children Develop a Lifelong Love of Learning? 'I Mean, the Bottom Line Is, Where's the Harm? It's a Kind of Win-Win'

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), December 31, 2009 | Go to article overview

Could Video Games in the Classroom Help Children Develop a Lifelong Love of Learning? 'I Mean, the Bottom Line Is, Where's the Harm? It's a Kind of Win-Win'


Byline: Matt Withers

IT'S a classic case of "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em".

Computer games - long considered the enemy of homework and widely seen as a key contributor to rising levels of obesity - are the latest teaching tool being explored by the Assembly Government in a bid to encourage children to learn.

"Brain-training" games, such as those for the top-selling Nintendo DS system, could become a fixture in schools, with experts claiming they could motivate pupils to develop skills.

It comes after Scotland's education minister said such games could play a key role in learning and that the DS in particular could have surprising education benefits for young people.

A spokesman for the Assembly Government said it was "always important to consider new technology when it comes to education".

He added: "We welcome developments that encourage young people to become enthusiastic learners."

In Scotland, education minister Mike Russell has been promoting the idea of computer games in schools, saying: "We need to embrace new technologies and tap into all the resources available to us to ensure that our young people develop successfully in a modern society within which computers are so important.

"Educational computer games can be a great way of motivating young people to learn in a way that is relevant and enjoyable for them.

"Computer games are often perceived as solely a distraction to learning.

"But alongside traditional learning aids, they can help make learning more engaging.

"Parents and teachers across the country are starting to see the benefits they can have."

Dr David Reynolds, an expert in the Welsh education system at the University of Plymouth, said he thought there was no harm in trying out such games and described it as a "win-win" situation.

He said: "My impression is that because these things are relatively new there actually hasn't been a lot of in-depth research about whether they are good or bad, but I think it's worth saying that if you look at the kind of things that people would have done with hard-copy equivalents, such as IQ tests and logical reasoning stuff, there is some evidence that it really does help and it's really good for children.

"I think it's also worth saying that people have been disappointed about the effects of IT in schools on children's development because a lot of money has been spent on it and I think people have been worried that it's hard to show the effects of all this kit.

"It may be a way of making some of the equipment in schools appear more relevant to children.

"It might be a kind of sugar coating, a new kind of technology that would persuade children that the existing technology is useful to them.

"I mean, the bottom line is, it's hard to see the harm.

"Where's the harm? It's a kind of win-win."

Brain-training games have been highly successful in recent years, particularly on the DS, a handheld games console specifically targeted by Nintendo at the kind of people who would not ordinarily play video games.

Among the most popular are those designed by the Japanese neuroscientist Ryuta Kawashima, although Nintendo has been careful not to claim the games have been scientifically validated, stating they are "entertainment products" inspired by Dr Kawashima''s work.

Dr David Miller of the University of Dundee has conducted studies into the effects of brain-training games on improving learning in partnership with the Scottish Government's education body Learning and Teaching Scotland (LTS). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Could Video Games in the Classroom Help Children Develop a Lifelong Love of Learning? 'I Mean, the Bottom Line Is, Where's the Harm? It's a Kind of Win-Win'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.