China Eyes the High Ground; Obama Talks of Cooperation, Not Competition on Space Exploration

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 8, 2010 | Go to article overview

China Eyes the High Ground; Obama Talks of Cooperation, Not Competition on Space Exploration


Byline: John J. Tkacik Jr., SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

In November, Chinese air force commander Gen. Xu Qiliang observed that competition between military forces is now turning toward the realm of space, [and] military modernization is ceaselessly expanding into space.

But during his visit to Beijing a few days later, President Obama talked about cooperation rather than competition. In a joint statement with Chinese President Hu Jintao, the two leaders called for a dialogue on human space flight and space exploration, based on the principles of transparency, reciprocity and mutual benefit.

China's aerospace industry firms - which for decades have supplied dangerous missile technologies and equipment to Iran, North Korea and Pakistan, and which have been sanctioned ceaselessly by four successive U.S. presidents for their transgressions - will find the United States in a new suppliant posture.

The atrophying U.S. space program suggests that America will be forced to cooperate with China in space, or else cede the high frontier of space to China altogether.

In October, a White House committee headed by former Lockheed Martin Chairman Norman Augustine, reported that without $3 billion in additional funding, NASA has no plan that permits human exploration to continue in any meaningful way.

October's launch of the experimental Ares 1-X heavy lift rocket, while flawless, may well mark the end rather than the beginning of America's next-generation Constellation manned-space program. The space shuttle is scheduled for retirement this year and until Constellation gets off the ground, future American astronauts will rely on Russians - or Chinese - to get into orbit - if they want to get there at all. America's multitrillion-dollar deficits over the next 10 years are likely to dissuade the Obama administration from budgeting for Constellation until well after Mr. Obama leaves office, if then.

The Pentagon is clearly alarmed by the prospect. The chief of U.S. Strategic Command, Gen. Kevin Chilton, told reporters Nov. 3, "With regard to China's [space] capabilities, I think anyone who's familiar with this business .. would have to be absolutely amazed at the advancement that China has made in such a short

period of time, whether that be in their unmanned program or the manned program"

Senior Chinese space officials have told their state media that China could be on the moon by 2022 at the outside. Other authoritative Chinese space engineers see a moon landing as a next step in the Tiangong program that will launch three Chinese space stations into Earth orbit between 2011 and 2015. In 2008, NASA scientists told the Bush White House that, with the technology currently available to the Chinese space program, Chinese cosmonauts could be on the moon by 2017.

NASA sees China's strategy for a manned lunar landing as launch vehicle intensive. While America's notional Constellation moon project centers on a single - and still unbuilt - Ares-V superheavy lift booster for a direct ascent to the moon and two lunar orbit rendezvous operations, China will likely opt for two complex Earth orbit rendezvous maneuvers.

This will require four Long March V rockets - in the same class as the Pentagon's Delta IV heavy lift launch vehicles - to put their cosmonauts on the moon. Launched in pairs over a two-week period from China's new Wenchang Space Center on the South China Sea island of Hainan, the four Long March Vs will each loft 26-ton payloads into low Earth orbits. The first mission will orbit the rocket for the translunar journey which will then join a second payload of an empty lunar module (LM) and its lunar-orbit rocket motor. Those first two unmanned payloads will rendezvous in Earth orbit and then fire off for the quarter-million-mile journey to the moon.

Once the unmanned LM is in a stable lunar orbit, the second pair of missions will be launched into Earth's orbit; the first with another translunar rocket motor and the second with a combined payload comprising the lunar orbiting module, a modified service module, an Earth re-entry module and the manned Shenzhou capsule with three Chinese cosmonauts. …

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