Lanao: The Idle Levant of the South

Manila Bulletin, January 16, 2010 | Go to article overview

Lanao: The Idle Levant of the South


Lanao del Sur is the epitome of unexplored natural beauty and rich culture. Situated in the upper central region of Mindanao island, it is a mountainous terrain of thirty-nine (39) municipalities and one city. Apart from being mistaken as the idle Levant of the south, this peaceful land mass continues to prove its high potential for both tourism and agro-aqua economic progress. The intrinsically vast natural resources and the hospitable character of its people are among its best features. It traces its origin in an area near the lake, thus the name “Lanao.” This prefecture practically ensures a splendid travel and visit to its scenic spots. The major inhabitants of the area are the M’ranaos or people by the lake. However, this district, having Marawi City as its capital, remains to be a melting pot of cultures in the south. Marawi City houses a shopper’s paradise called the “Padian,” or literally defined as a market. On this side of the town, you can find the most brilliant quality and beautifully colored satin and silk clothes used for the Muslim wardrobe and apparels. This is also where a vast array of imported Asian wares competes for attention with local handicrafts such as brass; woodcarving and woven products. It is, as a matter of fact, comparable to Thailand’s prominent bazaar. There are reminders of its exotic past all over the place as a trading port where Malays and other Asian tribes used to barter with the locals. You will likewise get to enjoy the so-called Summer Capital of the South with its cool and comforting breeze. The Mindanao State University is also situated here.Among the renowned municipalities of Lanao del Sur is Tugaya where inhabitants are mostly craftsmen and artisans of various pursuits. Each household specializes in some form of art or craft that is part of traditional Maranao culture: back-strap loom weaving, tapestry weaving, and other kinds of handmade textile manufacture; foundry casting of various forms of brass or bronze vessels, instruments, and decorative items; wood-carving and mother-of-pearl in-lay work; metalwork and silver- and gold-smithery - all of which utilizes the traditional Maranao form of decoration called “Okir. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lanao: The Idle Levant of the South
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.